TCC Graduate Earns National Recognition in Growing Construction Sciences Field 

FORT WORTH, Texas (March 22, 2017) – The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) recognized Tarrant County College graduate Karmin Ramos with the prestigious Outstanding Student Award during this year’s convention in Orlando, Florida.

 

The award recognizes students with strong academic achievement, significant involvement with their school’s NAHB chapter, and an interest in pursuing a residential building career. Orlando Bagcal, Ph.D., associate professor and coordinator of the College’s Construction Management Technology program on the TCC South Campus, nominated Ramos for the honor. She was one of 28 students in the country to earn the recognition.

 

“Karmin is an outstanding student, not only academically but as a leader,” Bagcal said. “She is a remarkable example of a persevering student who wants to achieve her educational goals and be successful in her chosen career.”

 

Ramos excelled in her studies while balancing a variety of activities, including serving as an intern at top-ranked construction management company Linbeck, as secretary of the Association of Construction Management Students, as a student senator for the TCC South Campus student government organization, and as a community volunteer. She earned her Associate of Applied Science in Construction Management Technology along with two construction certificates in spring 2016. She is continuing her studies at TCC in anticipation of transferring to the University of Texas at Arlington to work toward a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering.

 

Projections indicate continued population growth in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex, which is the largest metropolitan region in the southern United States, with more than 7 million residents. According to the Texas Workforce Commission, employment of construction managers in Tarrant County is expected to grow nearly 20 percent between 2012 and 2022.

 

TCC offers a variety of programs preparing students to design, build and manage projects throughout North Texas and beyond. Students practice their skills through volunteer projects, such as renovations for nonprofit groups, Habitat for Humanity and repairs for homeowners in need.

 

The Construction Management Technology program is part of the Center of Excellence for Energy Technology located on the TCC South Campus. The facility includes a 1,800-square-foot construction laboratory for materials testing, soil testing and surveying as well as a full-size residential house mockup. For more information on the Construction Management Technology program, visit the College’s website.

 

TCC to Focus on Aerospace Industry, Veterans during Second Annual Converge Conference & Expo

FORT WORTH, Texas (March 9, 2017) – On March 24, Tarrant County College will host its second annual Converge Conference & Expo, a regional meeting exploring cutting-edge research in tissue engineering and bioprinting. This year’s event, held at the Trinity River Campus, also will focus on innovations in the aerospace industry and provide career support for veterans and students in STEM careers.

 

The daylong conference will offer several sessions focusing on innovations in the aerospace industry, advances in tissue engineering, as well as STEM opportunities and achievements at TCC.

 

Keynote speaker Mathew Varkey, Ph.D., research fellow with the Wake Forest Institute of Regenerative Medicine, will discuss career pathways in regenerative medicine and how the discipline is being used to create living, functional tissues for repairing, even replacing, tissues or organs that no longer function, due to age, disease, damage or other problems.

 

During the morning session, Varkey will discuss specialized careers in tissue engineering and medicine with students from TCC Trinity River’s Texas Academy of Biomedical Sciences, TCC Northeast, as well as the Collegiate Academy at TCC Northeast. Lockheed Martin Vice President of Missiles and Fire Control Randy O’Neal will highlight the company’s products as well as insights into the future of manufacturing. TCC Chancellor Eugene V. Giovannini opens this year’s conference by greeting area veterans.

 

Additionally, one person will receive a travel scholarship to attend a summer course at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and four other students will receive awards from the TCC Foundation.

 

Attendees will have an opportunity to visit with STEM recruiters during the conference, which runs from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Action Suites on the fourth floor of the Trinity River Campus, 300 Trinity River Circle.

 

 

NBC 5: New TCC Southeast Course Helps Autistic Students Dream Big

NBC 5 recently aired a story highlighting Tarrant County College Southeast Campus offering a new computer animation class that’s opening doors for some autistic students. Reporter Larry Collins visited the American Dream City to see how this college course is preparing students for a brighter future.

Watch the NBC 5 story.

TCC Celebrates Women’s History Month

FORT WORTH, Texas (Feb. 27, 2017) – Tarrant County College will commemorate Women’s History Month with numerous public events to celebrate the history, strides and betterment of all women.
 
TCC campuses will offer events that include health care services, informative visual displays, self-defense training and career building workshops along with panel discussions.
 
Northeast Campus, 828 W. Harwood Road, Hurst:
On March 22, the Northeast Campus will host a self-defense class led by Instructional Adjunct and 4th degree black belt Shane Whitehead from 10 a.m. to noon. The class will teach awareness, assertiveness, verbal confrontation skills, safety strategies and physical techniques that help participants successfully prevent, escape, resist and survive violent assaults.
 
Northwest Campus, 4801 Marine Creek Parkway:
The Northwest Campus Student Leadership Academy will present “Marketable Skills: Women in the Workforce,” a workshop designed to help students build successful life skills that may be translated into the workforce. The workshop will take place March 9, from 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m.
 
A poster exhibit sponsored by the Northwest Campus Empowering Links organization will spotlight empowered women in the Northwest community. The exhibit will be on display from March 27 to March 30 in the bookstore lobby.
 
South Campus, 5301 Campus Drive:
The Triesha Light Annual Women’s Symposium will be held March 4 from 8:30 a.m. to noon in the Student Center Living Room, SSTU 2105. The Behavioral and Social Sciences Division and the Student Activities Office sponsor the symposium.
 
During the entire month of March, the South Campus library will present a visual display with the theme of “Women in the Labor Force.” The display will highlight the history and significance of women in the labor force.
 
Southeast Campus, 2100 Southeast Parkway:
On Mar. 21 and 29, beginning at 10 a.m., the Southeast Campus will show the documentary Painted Nails, which follows the life of Van Hoang, a Vietnamese nail salon owner who testifies before the United States Congress about the need for safer cosmetics. On March 30, Sharon Wettengel, TCC Assistant Professor of Sociology, will show clips and lead a moderated discussion of the Painted Nails documentary. The discussion will begin at 10 a.m. in the library classroom.
 
Trinity River Campus, 300 Trinity Campus Circle:
Jackie Opollo, Ph.D., director of Professional Practice & Nursing Research at Parkland Health and Hospital System and professor of Nursing at the University of Texas at Arlington, will lead a discussion about the importance of care and compassion in nursing at the Trinity River Campus. The discussion will be March 1 from noon to 1 p.m.
 
On March 30, the Trinity River Idea Store will present “A Conversation with the CEO of Catholic Charities, Heather Reynolds” from noon to 1 p.m. Reynolds will discuss how Catholic Charites Fort Worth is working to eradicate poverty.
 

WHM Events 2017 Final
 

What’s stopping you? TCC alum transitions from tough upbringing to full scholarship

Things are looking golden for Tre’Zjon Cothran. The Tarrant County College alumnus transferred to Texas Wesleyan University on full scholarship, and he is set to soon be the first college graduate in his family. Cothran has an ambitious career path ahead of him that includes becoming a police officer, an attorney and a judge. But that bright future wasn’t just handed to him. Growing up in south Fort Worth, Cothran was surrounded by gang activity. Some of his friends and relatives lost their lives to violence; others went away to prison. Cothran walked a fine line to get where he is today.
 
“I overcame my environment by not participating in criminal activities, but I also never turned my back on those around me,” explained Cothran. “I wanted to help them and always tried to speak knowledge and treat everyone equally.”
 
The path to college was far from a given for Cothran. He was considering joining the armed forces when he received an email stating he was accepted to TCC. He decided he would give higher education a try. While he enjoyed his classes at Trinity River Campus, something was missing.
 
“It did not feel much like college for the simple fact that I went to school and went straight home, just like high school,” Cothran recalled.
 
Enter the first of three mentors who would change his life: Steven LeMons, coordinator of Trinity River’s Writing & Learning Center. Cothran visited the center to get assistance with a paper during his first semester. The two struck up a conversation, and LeMons told Cothran about Men of Color, a student support program open to all but specifically designed to assist black and Hispanic males—who, nationwide, tend to enroll in higher education and complete their studies at lower rates than other demographic groups.
 
“I think Men of Color is a good fit for any young male who is trying to navigate his way through college,” said LeMons, who helped found the group at Trinity River. “It gives you an opportunity to bond with individuals who may be experiencing the same thing. Guys in general have trouble expressing weakness or asking for help. When you are involved with a group that answers your questions before you even ask them, that’s a good thing.”
 
Men of Color connects students to faculty and staff mentors and provides resources to boost academic achievement and leadership skills. The success rate is significant, with 77 percent of fall semester participants returning to TCC in the spring. In comparison, black and Hispanic men who aren’t involved in Men of Color have a retention rate of 43 percent.
 
“The program creates a level playing field,” said Freddie Sandifer, Men of Color coordinator. “Black and Hispanic men have the capabilities to succeed, but we may have to do more on the front end to ensure they take advantage of the tools and resources that are out there. Men of Color is about making these students understand that college is indeed for them.”
 
After filling out an application for Men of Color at LeMons’ recommendation, Cothran met Sandifer—who then connected Cothran to Sheldon Smart, communications and speech instructor, who would become Cothran’s official mentor through the program. Each man played a key role in molding Cothran into who he is today.
 

Trezjon with mentors.

Tre’Zjon, center, with Men of Color mentors Sheldon Smart, left, and Steven LeMons, right.

“Mr. LeMons was someone I could come to and discuss personal matters with and ask for guidance,” Cothran explained. “We discussed life-changing events and he gave me advice about how not to be distracted during the difficult times throughout my life.
 
“Mr. Sandifer taught me the business side of growing into a man. He taught me to carry myself as a professional and how to properly dress and network. Mr. Smart allowed me to see my capabilities and that I could achieve my goals. He taught me to never be afraid of chasing my dreams.”
 
The three mentors became a network of support, guiding Cothran through three semesters at TCC. He attended Men of Color workshops and events and even became a student worker for the organization. With a new sense of confidence and vision for his future, he applied and was accepted to Texas Wesleyan.
 
“Tre’Zjon has overcome quite a lot,” said Smart. “He has come a long way from growing up in a rough neighborhood and being financially poor. What I also admire about him is that he always has a job. This guy is willing to work hard for what he wants. He really does work long hours to make sure his mom and siblings are okay, all while attending school.”
 
After finishing his bachelor’s degree this December, Cothran plans to go into criminal justice—beginning as a police officer.
 
“After losing several friends and family members to gun violence, it made me want to be hands-on about removing criminals from the streets,” Cothran remarked. “I want to feel as if I am making the community safer for children. I also feel that there are not enough police officers in the field who can relate to someone of that background.”
 
Cothran wants to do more than take criminals off the streets; he wants to ensure justice is served. He would like to one day go to law school and eventually become a judge. His mentors have no doubt he will reach those goals.
 
“Other students can learn from him about hard work and determination despite experiencing a difficult and challenging home life,” noted Smart. “He also isn’t afraid to ask questions and seek advice and counsel.”
 
Cothran plans to use his experiences with Men of Color and the mentorship of LeMons, Sandifer and Smart to make a difference in the lives of others.
 
“Now that Tre’Zjon has been mentored, he feels a responsibility to give back,” said Sandifer. “He’s constantly encouraging those he grew up with to get an education and get engaged on campus.”
 
Cothran is already having an impact in the community, returning to TCC recently to serve as a speaker for a Men of Color event and serving as an officer for a similar group at Texas Wesleyan.
 
“Students can learn quite a bit from our workshops and seminars, but when you’re learning from a fellow student, you’re getting something from someone in the same time zone of life,” noted LeMons. “Tre’Zjon can share his first-hand experiences, how he succeeded and cultivated key relationships.”
 
For Cothran, it all comes down to those relationships—and he encourages other students to take time to get to know faculty and staff.
 
“With the contributions of these gentlemen, I realize I have a voice that not many others have,” said Cothran. “It made me feel that I could possibly be a role model for the next generation. Seeing individuals from similar backgrounds in successful positions gave me hope and confidence.”
 
This story is the latest in a series celebrating members of the TCC community who don’t let challenges stop them. Follow these links to read previous features:Salma Alvarez, Celia Mwakutuya, Jessica Caudle, Ken Moak, Melora Werlwas, Kevin Douglas, Marine Creek Collegiate High School students and students in atypical careers.
 

TCC Hosts Next Generation of Aviation Maintenance Professionals for Hands-On Competition

Students from across the region gather to demonstrate skills in high-demand field
 
FORT WORTH, Texas (Feb. 24, 2017) – Tarrant County College will host future aviation maintenance technicians from across the Southwest this month for the Professional Aviation Maintenance Association (PAMA) Aviation Maintenance Olympics. The event gives students an opportunity to demonstrate their skills in a field that is soaring in demand.
 
The eighth annual event will take place Saturday, Feb. 25, at the Erma C. Johnson Hadley Northwest Center of Excellence for Aviation, Transportation and Logistics—TCC’s training site at Alliance Airport. At 163,500 square feet, it is the largest aviation education facility in Texas.
 
Students from seven schools throughout the region—including institutions in Houston, Corpus Christi, Longview, Tulsa and North Texas—will take part in the competition, which includes parts assembly and installation along with safety techniques. All portions of the competition are hands on, with students using safety wire, hydraulic tubing, electrical conductors and more to showcase the speed, accuracy and expertise required of aviation technicians. Laboratory competition sponsors include American Airlines, US Aviation, Mair-Crafters Aviation, Tarrant Regional Water District, Ellis Precision Industries, Parker Hannifin/Aviall, Elbit Systems of America, Trimec Aviation, GE On-Wing Support, Broadie’s Aircraft, the DFW Chapter of PAMA and J & G Aviation; prizes are provided by Snap-On Tools.
 
The event provides networking opportunities and enhances students’ résumés.
 
“As the industry expands and technology advances, there is tremendous need for professionals who can safely and quickly take care of the worldwide fleet of aircraft,” said Darrell Irby, chair of TCC’s Aviation Department. “Our students spend countless hours preparing for their careers, and the PAMA Olympics are a fun way to put their skills to the test.”
 
To keep up with demand, the aviation industry will need more than 2 million new professionals through 2035—including 679,000 new maintenance technicians, according to the 2016 Boeing Pilot and Technician Outlook, an industry forecast. TCC offers associate degrees and certificates in aviation maintenance technology and airframe maintenance along with professional pilot training. For more information, visit the TCC website.
 
Media information: The competition runs 8 a.m. to approximately 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25. Awards will be presented at approximately 4 p.m. Visits are recommended between 2:15 and 3 p.m. for the most visual elements of the Olympics.
 

Tarrant County College South Campus to Host Building Sciences Expo 2017: What Lies Ahead

FORT WORTH, Texas (Feb. 15, 2017) – Tarrant County College South Campus will host Building Sciences Expo 2017: What Lies Ahead, a conference focusing on the opportunities, strategies and benefits of green building design on Wednesday, Feb. 22, from noon to 9 p.m. in the Center of Excellence for Energy Technology, 5301 Campus Drive.

 

The conference targets researchers, practitioners, architects, engineers, as well as faculty and students involved in building sciences. A variety of topics related to green buildings will be included, ranging from building science to project management, energy code, drone technology, energy modeling and a case study for the LEED-Platinum Certified Center of Excellence for Energy Technology.

 

Admission to the expo is free; dinner tickets are $25 and may be purchased at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/north-texas-building-sciences-expo-2017-tickets-30259494964. Attendees will receive five continuing education units from the American Institute of Architects Fort Worth Chapter.

 

TCC Community & Industry Education Services are hosting the conference in partnership with the American Institute of Architects Fort Worth, Construction Specifications Institute and U.S Green Building Council Texas Chapter.

 

For more information or to register for the conference, please contact Derek Hubernak at 817-515-4167 or visit https://www.tccd.edu/community/conferences-and-seminars/building-sciences-expo/.

 

 

Makers to Convene at Trinity River Campus for FAB Now 2017

Visit the registration page by clicking the image.

Fort Worth, Texas (Feb. 15, 2017)

 

WHAT:

Tarrant County College Trinity River Campus is collaborating with The Texas MAKERS Guild to host FAB Now 2017, a three-day  educational meetup and expo for anyone who wants to know more about the Maker Movement or would like to demonstrate their maker skills. A national trend, the maker movement is considered “the platform” on which today’s artisans create, craft and develop leading ideas and products.

 

FAB Now 2017 is expected to attract educators, engineers, scientists, artists, entrepreneurs and families. Now in its third year, FAB offers demos and hands-on activities that bring together 3D printing, computer numerically controlled production resources, art and design for creative expression and community-oriented problem solving, according to event organizers.

 

The three-day conference features presenters from throughout the region, as well as live-streamed presentations from across the nation. FAB Now 2017 is free and open to the public.

 

Conference Highlights

  • Students MAKE Showcase (K-12 and college) – Saturday, Feb. 18
  • Maker Expo & Vendors Trade Show – Saturday, Feb. 18 and Sunday, Feb. 19
  • Making Together: Creative Making for Families – Sunday, Feb. 19

 

WHEN:

Friday, Feb. 17, 2017

1 to 5 p.m.

 

Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017

9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

 

Sunday, Feb. 19, 2017

1 to 5 p.m.

 

WHERE:

Tarrant County College Trinity River Campus

Action and Energy Rooms (4th Floor)

300 Trinity Campus Circle

Fort Worth, Texas 76102

 

 

 

Tarrant County College to Host Fort Worth Regional Science Olympiad    

FORT WORTH, Texas (Feb. 9, 2017)Tarrant County College South Campus will host the Fort Worth Regional Science Olympiad on Saturday, Mar. 4, 2017, welcoming hundreds of area middle and high school students interested in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM).

 

Modeled after the Olympic Games, participating teams can compete in 15 science events per division, ranging from anatomy & physiology and helicopters to wind power and optics at this qualifying competition. Teams can apply and display a wide variety of talents, from design and prototyping to technical writing and chemistry lab skills.

 

This is the first year the TCC South Campus will host a Science Olympiad, one of the country’s premier science competitions. The event will feature two divisions divided by grade level: Division B for middle school students (grades 6 through 8) and Division C for high school students (grades 9 through 12). An awards ceremony will follow the day-long competition. The annual Science Olympiad began in 1983 and involves more than 12,000 schools nationally.

 

Students will compete in challenging and motivational events that are well-balanced between the various science and engineering disciplines of biology, earth science, chemistry, physics, computers and technology. There is also a balance between events requiring knowledge of facts, concepts, processes, skills and science applications.

 

“TCC South Campus is honored to host the Fort Worth Regional Science Olympiad through a partnership with the State Science Olympiad Office at Texas A&M University and the National Science Olympiad Office,” said TCC South President Peter Jordan. “Three South Campus divisions are collaborating to host this inaugural competition:  Business and Technology, Community & Industry Education (CIE) and Mathematics and Natural Science. The competition will feature 15 events for registered teams in the B Division (middle school) and C Division (high school).”

 

Science Olympiad is a nonprofit organization developed to improve the quality of science education, increase student interest in science and provide recognition of outstanding achievement in science education by both students and teachers. Their ever-evolving line-up of events in all STEM disciplines exposes students to practicing scientists and career choices, and energizes classroom teachers with a dynamic content experience.

 

Winners from the regional competition go on to compete in state and national Science Olympiads. In Texas, the state competition will be held at Texas A&M University in College Station.

 

For more information about the regional competition or to learn how  to register schools to compete this year or next year, please contact Erika Zimmermann at 817-515-4157 or visit http://www.tccd.edu/academics/cie/lifelong-learning/youth-programs/fw-regional-science-olympiad/

 

Traveling World War I Museum Visits TCC’s Northwest Campus in Honor of War’s Centennial

Tuesday, Feb. 14 – Friday, Feb. 17
TCC Northwest Campus (4801 Marine Creek Pkwy., Fort Worth), WSTU 1305
Free

 
FORT WORTH, Texas (February 8, 2017) – As the United States marks 100 years since it entered World War I, a special exhibit is making a stop at Tarrant County College. The community is invited to visit the WWI 100th Anniversary Mobile Museum Feb. 14 through Feb. 17 at Northwest Campus. TCC is the first college to host the museum, which is in the middle of a four-year tour to commemorate World War I’s centennial (2014 to 2018).
 
The mobile museum, curated by Dallas historian Keith Colley, tells the story of the “War to End All Wars” and spotlights the life of Ernest Loucks. Loucks served in the U.S. Army and kept a variety of artifacts, many of which are part of the display. A tool used to help dig 25,000 miles of trenches dug in World War I; a movie camera on which soldiers filmed images from battle; British and American gas masks and two rare pigtail stakes that held barbed wire, used as a new form of warfare are included in the exhibition.
 
“This is a unique opportunity to gain a greater respect for our veterans who served in a conflict that truly changed the world,” said Laura Matysek Wood, Ph.D., professor of history and government. “Without any living World War I veterans, it is more important than ever to preserve and share this history.”
 
The exhibit is open to the TCC students, faculty and staff as well as the public. Admission is free. The museum will be set up in WSTU 1305. Hours are:
• Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 14 and 15, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
• Thursday, Feb. 16, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.
• Friday, Feb. 17, 9:30 a.m. to noon.
 
For more information on the WWI 100th Anniversary Mobile Museum, visit ww1mobilemuseum.com. Details on the TCC exhibition are available from Laura Matysek Wood at laura.wood@tccd.edu or 817-515-7280.