TCC Honors Veterans

Woman in grass surrounded by US flagsFORT WORTH, Texas (Oct. 24, 2016) While Tarrant County College campuses are hosting several events to honor veterans in November, the College is paving the way with a few events in October including:

  • A weekly book discussion of Tim O’Brien’s book, The Things They Carried, on Tuesday, Oct. 25, at Northwest Campus, 4801 Marine Creek Parkway, in the Walsh Library from 2 to 3 p.m. The discussions will be held each Tuesday through Nov. 22. Northwest Campus also will observe Flag Days Oct. 31 through Nov. 3.
  • Warrior Training on Friday, Oct. 28 at the South Campus, 5301 Campus Drive. From 1 to 3 p.m. UT Dallas Brain Science Center will instruct on learning techniques and addressing challenges for stress and sleep apnea. Please RSVP to Valerie Groll at valerie.groll@tccd.edu or call 817-515-4894.

 
Trinity River Campus, 300 Trinity Campus Circle
A multigenerational community breakfast and Vet Success Fair will be held Monday, Nov. 7, from 8 to 10 a.m., celebrating students, campus and community heroes. Lt. Col. Kevin Sweeney, a distinguished combat pilot, will be the keynote speaker. Following the breakfast, students and guests are invited to attend the Vet Success Fair to learn about available academic and community support services. Breakfast will be hosted in the Action Suite Room A. The fair will be in the Action Suite Room B (TRTR 4th Floor).
 
South Campus, 5301 Campus Drive
Don Graves, a survivor of the Battle of Iwo Jima, will speak at a Veterans Day Celebration Wednesday, Nov. 9, from 12:30 to 2 p.m. in the Student Union (SSTU-Dining Room). TCC will honor 25 Vietnam veterans with a commemorative letter pin. The Color Guard ceremony will begin at 12:30 p.m. Please RSVP to Valerie Groll at valerie.groll@tccd.edu or 817-515-4894 or Geneva Castro at geneva.castro@tccd.edu.
 
Northeast Campus, 828 W. Harwood Road, Hurst
On Thursday, Nov. 10, Northeast Campus will host a flag-raising ceremony and luncheon for veterans. The events will be held from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in the Larry Darlage Center Corner, NSTU 1615A. Contact David Sallee at david.sallee@tccd.edu or 817-515-6565 for more information.
 
Southeast Campus, 2100 Southeast Parkway, Arlington
A Veterans Day ceremony will be held to honor veterans Friday, Nov. 11, from 11 a.m. to noon, in the Main Commons. Following the ceremony, a luncheon for veterans and their families will be held in the Library Classroom. No RSVP is needed for either event.
 
Northwest Campus, 4801 Marine Creek Parkway
A special Veterans Day tribute to honor past and present members of the United States Armed Forces will be held Friday, Nov. 11, from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m., in the Student Union. Speakers include retired Army Sgt. 1st Class Edwin A. Beckcom. Entertainment will include the TCC Northwest Choir, Piano Concert and the Saginaw Color Guard. Limited seating is available. Please RSVP by Oct. 28. For more information contact the Community & Industry Education Department at 817-515-2158.
 

TCC Seeks Applicants for Vacant Board Seat

FORT WORTH, Texas (July 26, 2016) – Tarrant County College announced that residents in District 3 may apply to be considered for a nine-month appointment for the seat that became vacant when longtime board member Kristin Vandergriff resigned July 12.
 
The deadline for applications is Monday, Aug. 1, at 4 p.m. Final review of candidates will take place at a Special Board meeting Aug. 4 at 5 p.m. in downtown Fort Worth at the District Office, 1500 Houston Street. The new board member will be sworn in at the next regular board meeting Aug. 18.
 
The candidate appointed to the position will serve until the next regular election for members of the Board of Trustees in May 2017. The winner of the special election will serve until the end of the original term that ends May 2021.
 
Candidates for the position must be a resident of District 3 that represents southeast Tarrant County, which includes north and central Arlington and part of Euless.
 
Applicants should submit their letter of interest and resume to louise.appleman@tccd.edu or mail to:
 
ATTN: Louise Appleman
Tarrant County College District
Chancellor’s Office
1500 Houston Street
Fort Worth, Texas 76102
 
More information is available on the TCC website at tccd.edu/boardapplication.

TCC Board Announces Two Finalists for Chancellor

FORT WORTH, Texas (May 20, 2016) – Following a national search, Tarrant County College Board of Trustees Thursday announced the selection of two finalists for chancellor, the top administrative leadership post at the College, the 12th largest institution of higher education in the United States.
 
Finalists are Eugene V. Giovannini, Ed.D., founding president of Maricopa Corporate College in Scottsdale, Ariz., and Barbara Kavalier, Ph.D., district president at Navarro College in Corsicana.
 
Two public forums for students, faculty, staff and the community will be held Thursday, June 2, in the Energy Auditorium at TCC’s Trinity River Campus from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. TCC faculty and executive leadership also will meet with the candidates.
 
Trinity River Campus is located at 300 Trinity Campus Circle in downtown Fort Worth.
 
The board is expected to name the sole finalist for chancellor at a special board meeting on June 9. Following a 21-day period, as specified by Texas Education Code, the appointment as chancellor will be official.
 
Giovannini has served the Maricopa County Community College District in Arizona since 2002, including 11 years as president of Gateway Community College in Phoenix. He began his community college career in 1983 at Virginia’s Eastern Shore Community College as an instructor for two years before becoming chair of Office Technologies at Broome Community College in New York.
 
In 2014, Giovannini was appointed to the board of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship. He earned his doctorate in Community College Education from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and his Bachelor of Science in Business Education and Master of Education from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.
 
Kavalier has more than 30 years of community college experience, including two community college presidencies and senior level experience in academic and student affairs at large urban and smaller colleges. She served more than 20 years with the Dallas County Community College District, three years as associate vice president at Tacoma Community College in Washington, three years at San Diego Mesa College as vice president of student services and three years as president of San Jose City College in California.
 
She earned her doctorate in Educational Administration with specialization in Community College Leadership from The University of Texas in Austin. She graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Science in English from Texas Christian University and earned her Master of Science in Business and Human Relations from Amberton University. Additionally, she earned her Associate of Arts and Science degree from DCCCD Mountain View College, where she later became an adjunct professor.
 
Kavalier’s experience also includes serving as the self-study director for Mountain View College before she was recruited to serve as president of San Jose College to focus on resolving accreditation issues. She has authored two books on community colleges.
 
TCC General Counsel and Vice Chancellor Angela Robinson has been serving as acting chancellor since TCC Chancellor Erma Johnson Hadley passed away in early October 2015.

TCC Horticulture Students Showcase Harvest at Annual Plant Sale

Community invited to purchase flowers, bulbs, vegetables and more
 
WHEN: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 6
 
WHERE: Northwest Campus (4801 Marine Creek Pkwy., Fort Worth; aviation hangar)
 
FORT WORTH, Texas (March 28, 2016) – Tarrant County College horticulture students will showcase more than 50 varieties of flowers, bulbs, vegetables and herbs during the program’s annual plant sale from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 6.
 
Open to the community, the sale will be held at the Northwest Campus aviation hangar (4801 Marine Creek Pkwy., Fort Worth) and will feature flowering annuals and perennials including impatiens, begonias, snapdragons and petunias; foliage plants such as coleus; vegetables including peppers and heirloom tomatoes; and herbs such as basil, oregano and thyme. Students cultivated all items as part of their coursework in the Horticulture Program.
 
“This is a wonderful opportunity for the College and community to get beautiful plants and fresh vegetables at below-retail prices—and support the next generation of horticulture professionals at the same time,” said David Bulpitt, coordinator of the Horticulture Program.
 
Most items range from $1.50 to $6. Cash and checks will be accepted. Proceeds help horticulture students cover the cost of field trips and Horticulture Club projects.
 
The Horticulture Program is taught at Northwest Campus, which features on-site greenhouses, gardens and a vineyard. Students learn greenhouse operation and management; landscape design, installation and maintenance; nursery and retail garden center operation and management; soil science; and pest control. Day and evening classes are available. Students can earn a certificate of completion or an associate degree and get the foundation for continuing their studies at a university. Horticulture courses also are offered for personal enrichment.
 

TCC Conference Sets Stage for Next Step As It Forges Leadership Role in Fusion of Science, Art and Technology

TR_3D_expo_2020

TCC Converge Conference and Expo luncheon speaker Wake Forest scientist Mathew Varkey, Ph.D., a research fellow in the Wake Forest Institute of Regenerating Medicine Research.


FORT WORTH, Texas (March 25, 2016) Attendees to Tarrant County College’s first Converge Conference & Expo learned about cutting-edge research in tissue engineering/bioprinting Friday because luncheon speaker Wake Forest scientist Mathew Varkey, Ph.D., believes researchers have a moral responsibility to share their research with the general public.
 
“We do a lot of work with different tissues and bioprinting techniques. Ultimately what we do will be in common use, so people need to be aware of what we are doing,” said Varkey, a research fellow in the Wake Forest Institute of Regenerating Medicine Research. “It is equally important to share what we do with the public to inspire the next generation.”
 
Varkey is part of a team using a combination of living cells and a special gel to print out living human body parts. The research at Wake Forest, often featured in the national news, could one-day result in an alternate organ source for more than 121,000 Americans on the waiting list for an organ, according to the United Network for Organ Sharing.
 
“An Inside Look at Tissue Engineering—The World of Bioprinting” is what he discussed to an audience that included students from the Texas Academy of Biomedical Sciences (TABS), a partnership among TCC, Fort Worth ISD, the University of North Texas and the UNT Health Science Center.
 
Saying that his current work was not part of his career path, Varkey said, he would encourage students to learn as much as they can. “You need not know where you plan to, but make sure you get the basic fundamentals right and be open minded to explore,” he said. “My career was not a conscious choice, but my training and experience ultimately led me to it.”
 
His career decisions that eventually led him to the biomedical work he is doing now also were influenced by his personal experience of a traumatic brain injury received in a car accident when he was an 18-year-old student in India, said Varkey, who earned both of his graduate degrees at the University of Alberta, Canada. His college career was delayed about a year while he recuperated from a broken nose and overcome partial frontal brain injuries involving blood clots and memory lost.
 
“The experience caused me to want to be involved in a career that could improve quality of life for those who have experienced trauma,” Varkey said.
 
TCC’s conference and expo, “Exploring the Fusion of Science, Art and Technology in a 3-D World,” also focused on discussions on economic development and how it relates to additive manufacturing. Industry leaders were on hand with exhibits that provided firsthand looks at technology currently available that will play a role in the process in software technologies and printing included 3dDigital, Fanuc, LabResources Renishaw, Stratasys, and TechLabs.
 
Joint conference planner William Kucera, Ph.D., TCC chemistry professor, said the conference and expo allowed TCC to address the major shortfall the United States faces in producing engineers/scientists with skills that support manufacturing and product development.
 
“Students in science & engineering need exposure to industry and manufacturing. Talking with leading engineering and scientific technology companies will do wonders to open their minds to the range of career possibilities,” Kucera said. “The key to awakening students about potential careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) is to expose them to cutting edge research and developments that reaches beyond the normal topics of today’s classroom,”
 
The conference is a launching point as TCC takes the first steps this spring focusing on the creation of a series of courses involving additive manufacturing that includes materials for 3-D printing, prototyping and 3-D technology. The new course at Northeast Campus will enhance existing manufacturing technology programs at South Campus. Introduction to Solid Modeling & 3D Printing will meet April 18 to May 4 from 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.
 
“These new courses will start as stackable credentials for professional development and non-credit workforce programs,” said Fred Schmidt, conference joint planner and manger of Community & Industry Education Program Development for the District. “These will create the foundation to build out a comprehensive program in the future.”
 
More information about TCC’s introductory 3D course is available from the Northeast Campus Office of Community & Industry Education at 817-515-6502. Registration is available online through WebAdvisor at waj.tccd.edu.
 
NE Prez w CIE Program Developer

TCC Northeast Campus President Allen Goben, left, addresses conference along with joint planner Fred Schmidt, manager of Community & Industry Education Program Development for the District.                                                                             

Industry leader with students.

Industry leader talks with students at TCC’s first Converge Conference & Expo.

University rep talks STEM w student.

Student learns more about Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) programs from representative participating in the STEM-focused university fair at the Converge Conference & Expo.

Panelists at Converge Conf & Expo

David Berzina, executive vice president of Economic Development for Fort Worth Chamber of Commerce, right, serves as Economic Development panelist with Judy McDonald, executive director of
Workforce Solutions for Tarrant County.

Tarrant County College Hosts Celebration to Mark Commitment to Employee Well-Being

TCC is Fort Worth’s first higher education institution to become a Blue Zones Project Approved worksite
 
FORT WORTH, Texas (Jan. 28, 2016) – Making healthy choices easier is now all in a day’s work for employees of Tarrant County College, as all five TCC campus locations and the District office have become Blue Zones Project Approved™ worksites. Blue Zones Project®—a community-led well-being initiative—is partnering with TCC to create a culture that makes wellness a priority through changes to campus environment, policy and attitudes.
 
Blue Zones Project and TCC are hosting campus celebrations to mark the worksite designation and kick off the next phase of well-being efforts. The events culminate with the District office festivities, 2:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 29, at TCC’s May Owen Center, 1500 Houston St., Fort Worth. Mayor Betsy Price will be present.
 
TCC—the 12th-largest higher education institution in the United States—is the first college to earn recognition by Blue Zones Project, Fort Worth. In order to achieve Blue Zones Project approval, worksites must fulfill the requirements of the Blue Zones Project Worksite Pledge. This includes implementing best practices in a variety of areas, including physical surroundings, employee engagement, policies and benefits, and leadership.
 
“Committing to well-being through Blue Zones Project was the right thing to do, for employees as well as the College,” said Ricardo Coronado, associate vice chancellor for human resources. “Staff who have strong well-being perform better and ultimately lead healthier, more fulfilling lives. We’ve had employees lose weight, go off medication, and completely change their outlook.”
 
Blue Zones Project is patterned after lifestyles in the world’s Blue Zones® areas, which have higher levels of contentment, reduced rates of chronic diseases, and greater numbers of people reaching age 100. Launched in August 2015, TCC’s worksite initiatives center on adding movement to employees’ routines, creating healthier and tastier campus food options, helping employees downshift, and building stronger connections among colleagues.
 
Last fall, TCC faculty and staff began participating in Blue Zones Project’s Walking Moias, small social groups that walk together each week while creating bonds with others who also support healthy behaviors. TCC is now kicking off Potluck Moias, groups that will gather over the course of the next ten weeks to share healthy, plant-based meals and fellowship.
 
As part of the Blue Zones Project Worksite Pledge, more than 25 percent of TCC employees signed the Blue Zones Project Personal Pledge. Individuals who take the personal pledge agree to adopt small changes that are proven to increase wellness, extend life expectancy, and reduce stress. Personal Pledge actions may include eliminating electronic distractions in the bedroom; building a social circle that supports positive behaviors; and designating a space in the home for quiet time, meditation, or prayer.
 
TCC joins an elite network of local Blue Zones Project Approved organizations in Fort Worth, including 20 restaurants, four grocery stores, and nine other area worksites.
 
About Blue Zones Project:
Blue Zones Project is a community-led well-being initiative aimed at making healthier choices easier for people who live, work, and play in Fort Worth. Fort Worth is currently a Blue Zones Project Demonstration Site. Over the coming years, the city will implement environmental changes in six key areas, including worksites, schools, grocery stores, restaurants, individuals, and community policy. Once city-specific goals are met, Fort Worth will be certified as a Blue Zones Community®. For more information, visit https://fortworth.bluezonesproject.com/.
 
About Tarrant County College:
Tarrant County College is a public two-year college with campuses in Fort Worth and surrounding communities. TCC is the 12th-largest higher education institution in the United States based on annual enrollment, with more than 100,000 students in academic, career training and noncredit Community & lndustry Education programs. The College provides affordable, quality education in a welcoming and diverse atmosphere. TCC offers both on-campus and online learning, with a strong support system to help students from all backgrounds meet their academic and professional goals. Visit www.tccd.edu
 

TCC Seeks Firm for National Search for Chancellor

FORT WORTH, Texas (Jan. 13, 2016) – Tarrant County College District, the nation’s 12th-largest higher education institution, is requesting proposals from executive search firms and organizations to conduct the search for a chancellor, the top administrative leadership post at the institution.
 
The deadline for submission is Thursday, Feb. 4. A copy of the Request for Proposal (RFP) is available on the TCC web site at:
www.tccd.edu/Bid_Information/Current_Open_Bids.html
 
Board members approved the development of an RFP for a professional chancellor search firm last November. TCC General Counsel and Vice Chancellor Angela Robinson has been serving as acting chancellor since TCC Chancellor Erma Johnson Hadley passed away in early October.
 
TCC Board President Louise Appleman said, “Our Board has unanimously determined that a national search will help us identify the best leader for our 100,000 students, almost 5,000 faculty and staff and the taxpayers who support our mission.”
 
Appleman also said the board plans to communicate with students, faculty, staff and the community throughout the process.
 

Follow Tips to Fight the Flu

Boxing flu germIt’s that time of year again: Flu season.

That’s right.  It’s the time of the year when we give glares to anyone near us that dare cough or clutch a fistful of tissues as though they were their last hope.  The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) likes to remind us, though, that we can help reduce our chances for contracting the flu by following a few key steps:

  1. First, get a flu shot.  Many local clinics will be offering them.
  2. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  3. Cough or sneeze into your sleeve and elbow rather than your hands.
  4. Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  5. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  6. Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  7. If you are sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.)
  8. While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  9. Try to avoid crowds during an influenza outbreak.

To learn more about influenza, check out the CDC’s Flu Season section of their website.

Stay healthy this season!

TCC Celebrates 10 Years of Empowering Professionals

Lorraine C. Miiller

Lorraine C. Miller

FORT WORTH, Texas (Nov. 18, 2015) – Honoring its commitment to professional development and service to the community, Tarrant County College South Campus Community & Industry Education Services is sponsoring its 10th annual Ariel Hunter-Chriss African American Professionals Conference on Friday, Nov. 20.
 
The conference, held in partnership with DFW Community Partners, will be held at TCC South Campus, 5301 Campus Drive. The continental breakfast and registration begin at 7:45 a.m., with the opening session starting at 8:35 a.m. The luncheon is from 11:30 a.m. to 1:15 a.m. in the Student Center dining hall. Workshops will be held from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. and 2:40 p.m. to 3:40 p.m.
 
Lorraine C. Miller, 35th Clerk to the U.S. House of Representatives, the first African American and third woman to hold the position, is the opening speaker. Miller also was the former Interim President and CEO of the NAACP in Washington, D.C.
 
The luncheon speaker is Sheron C. Patterson, who has a doctorate in ministry. Patterson has worked 25 years as a relationship counselor, media personality and author. She has been featured in Ebony, JET, Essence and on national television’s CNN and BET. Locally, she is the relationship expert on WFAA TV 8’s Good Morning Texas.
 
Named for founder Ariel Hunter-Chriss, Continuing Education Services director at South Campus until her death in 2009, the purpose of the conference is to provide leadership strategies and tools for business professionals, entrepreneurs and community leaders to manage career challenges created by diversified and global competition. Continuing Education Services is the former name of Community & Industry Education Services.

Sheron C. Patterson

Sheron C. Patterson


 
The conference also provide an opportunity for contributions to be made to scholarship fund established in Chriss’ honor for children to attend TCC’s annual summer enrichment program, College for Kids. Donations may be made online at ww.tccd.edu/foundation and click on “Give Now.”
 
By mail, checks should be made to Tarrant County College Foundation, please indicate Ariel Hunter-Chriss Scholarship Fund on the check on in an attached letter. Mail to: Alex Allred, TCC Foundation, 1500 Houston Street, Fort Worth, TX 76102.
 
Conference sponsors and partners include Jim Austin Online, Minority Leaders and Citizens Council, Sam’s Club, Unity One Credit Union and Workforce Solutions of Tarrant County.
 
Registration for the conference is $69 for professionals and $39 for students. To register, contact Alisa Jones at alisa.jones @tccd.edu or 817-515-4598.
 

TCC Employee Elected to APTA Board

According to the “Work Faces” column in the Oct. 11 Fort Worth Star-Telegram, McEwing_Andre_2754 (4)TCC Supplier Diversity Manager Andre McEwing recently was elected to the 2015-16 Board of the Directors of the American Public Transportation Association. McEwing has served on the Board of Directors for the Fort Worth Transportation Authority for three years and is in his second term as vice chairman.