TCC Announces Spring Fine Arts and Visual Arts Events

FORT WORTH, Texas (Jan. 31, 2017) In keeping with its commitment to excellence in the arts, Tarrant County College offers a variety of opportunities to enjoy dance, drama and music events and visual arts exhibits during the spring semester.
 
Those Before Me opens Feb. 16 and runs through Feb. 18 at the Joe B. Rushing Center for Performing Arts at the South Campus, 5301 Campus Drive. Researched and performed by TCC students, the drama honors women’s history. TCC students, faculty and staff attend free of charge. General admission is $5. Show times are 7:30 p.m. nightly.
 
The Festival of New Plays features three award-winning, 10-minute plays written by students who submitted their work in a playwriting competition last fall. Opening on February 22 and running through Feb. 24 at the C.A. Roberson Theatre at the Southeast Campus, 2100 Southeast Parkway, Arlington, festival performances are 7:30 p.m. nightly. A matinee at 1:30 p.m. on Feb. 24 will highlight an expanded version of MetAMORfosis, by Carlos Romero, last year’s first-place winner in the competition. The play will be performed at the Region 6 Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival in March. Tickets for the Festival of New Plays are free to TCC students, faculty and staff, $3 for non-TCC students and senior citizens and $6 general admission.
 
Students have a mystery to solve when MISS NELSON IS MISSING! premieres March 1 at the Northwest Campus, 4801 Marine Creek Parkway. The play, which continues through March 5, features Miss Nelson, a teacher who is just too nice and cannot seem to control her classroom. When she suddenly disappears, her hard-as-nails substitute, Viola Swamp, has her students ready to do anything to bring Miss Nelson back. General admission is $3. Show times are 7:30 nightly and 2 p.m. on Saturday.
 
A diverse cross-section of music, ranging from the Middle Ages to the contemporary era, will be performed March 28 at the Northeast Campus, 828 Harwood Road, Hurst. During the concert, audience members move through four rooms, each featuring a different era’s music. The concert, which is free of charge, begins at 7 p.m.
 
On March 29, the Southeast Campus will host a Swing Dance and Music Benefit, which features the TCC SE Jazz Ensemble playing traditional big band swing music. Dance instructors will be available to teach basic swing dance steps. An auction of art by TCC instructors and students will take place. Additionally, art will be available for sale. Guests are encouraged to dress in the style of the 1920s. Tickets are $5 for TCC students and $10 general admission. All proceeds will go toward scholarships for SE Campus Fine Arts students studying Art, Dance and Music.
 
Starting April 3, the Northwest Campus presents DADA Week, a celebration of the unlimited potential of human expression. The art exhibit shows how DADA connects all areas of study, including the rational and irrational. It is an example of thinking outside of what is expected and challenges students to invent new directions of their own. The exhibit will be available in the Lakeview Gallery through April 7.
 
Fine Arts and Visual Arts Events – Spring 2017
 

What’s stopping you? TCC alum finds spotlight in challenging career field

Photo credit: Hans Rosemond Photography

Photo: Hans Rosemond Photography

Tarrant County College alumnus Kevin Douglas has an unconventional résumé. In the skills section, you’ll find (among other abilities) 10 dialects, beatboxing, balloon sculptures and juggling. For Pert Durapau, chair of the Department of Speech and Drama and director of theatre at Southeast Campus, that last entry symbolizes Douglas’ above-and-beyond commitment to the craft of acting.
 

“Kevin was playing the lead in La Bête, and I wanted the character to juggle,” recalled Durapau of directing Douglas during his time as a student in the 1990s. “He’d never done it before. I said, ‘Do you think you can learn?’ Two weeks later, Kevin was juggling while reciting lines and playing a very sophisticated role.”
 
He taught himself to juggle without the benefit of instructional videos that are just a click away on the internet today.
 
“Kevin is exceptionally talented,” Durapau noted. “So are many students. But Kevin also has an incredible passion for working hard in rehearsal—then coming back the next day really having mastered the things that were asked of him and ready to grow more.”
 
Inspired by Eddie Murphy, Douglas knew he would be an actor in eighth grade. His high school drama teacher suggested Douglas attend TCC so he could study under Durapau, then director of Northwest Campus’ theatre. While Douglas wanted to be on stage or in front of the camera, Durapau had a broader education in store.
 
“Pert ran the theatre department in a way that allowed you to learn the ins and outs of the entire industry and not just your discipline,” said Douglas. “It was hands on, and all hands had to help build the production.”
 
Douglas spent two years at TCC, developing a strong GPA, taking part in numerous productions and absorbing Durapau’s teaching. He credits Durapau with helping him take the next step by encouraging him to try out for the country’s top theatre schools.
 
Douglas and a few other students drove to Houston for a nationwide, multi-school audition. He returned home with an invitation for admission from DePaul University. Knowing nothing about Chicago except the Bulls and Oprah Winfrey, Douglas moved to the city to earn his Bachelor of Fine Arts.
 
“Those years were challenging and formative,” he said. “Working and balancing a full load of classes—if I hadn’t gone to TCC I would not have made it through. TCC gave me the discipline to handle a university.”
 
He graduated from DePaul in 2000. Then it was time to try to turn his passion for performance into a profession.
 
“Acting is not an easy career,” he said frankly. “Most of acting is about auditioning and, unfortunately, not getting the job.”
 
Douglas remained determined. He worked three or four jobs at a time to support himself, always trying to ensure that one position was related to his degree. Fortunately, his broad foundation from TCC’s theatre program gave him options in the industry. And he never quit believing that he would be successful as an actor.
 
“What I learned early on is that I can’t control the people I’m auditioning for,” he explained. “I can control only how I prepare and present myself. Once I realized that, it made auditioning more fun and less stressful.”
 
He began gaining professional experience, doing voiceovers, commercials and children’s theatre as well as serving as a teaching artist—in which he partnered with a public school teacher to enhance the learning process.
 
In 2008, Douglas landed at Chicago’s Tony Award-winning Lookingglass Theatre Company as an artistic associate. It was a turning point. One of the top theatre companies in the country, Lookingglass is renowned for its use of physical theatre, improvisation, collaboration and adaptations—all areas Douglas enjoyed and wanted to explore further in his career.
 
After multiple readings, he was cast in one show and then another and another. He began to tour with the company, performing in “Lookingglass Alice,” a modern adaptation of Lewis Carroll’s work, 484 times. The role required him to quickly learn physical feats and daring stunts and helped cement his status with the company. After five years, Lookingglass asked him to join its prestigious mainstay ensemble.
 

Kevin Douglas, far left, in “The Great Fire.” Photo: Sean Williams, courtesy of Lookingglass Theatre


 
“The move was definitely well-deserved,” praised Michigan Avenue Magazine in 2013. “Douglas put on show-stopping performances in plays such as ‘Mr. Rickey Calls a Meeting’ and ‘The Great Fire’ last season, and many others in seasons past.”
 
Douglas also is thriving as a writer and sketch comedian. He has performed in events such as the HBO U.S. Comedy Arts Festival, the NBC/Universal Sketch Comedy Showdown and The Just For Laughs Festival in Chicago; he also produces weekly sketches on YouTube with his wife, Tamberla Perry, a fellow actor. His writing and acting have been nominated for multiple Black Theatre Alliance Awards, and in October he won for the first time—taking home Best Writing of a Play for Thaddeus and Slocum: A Vaudeville Adventure, for which Douglas wrote both dialogue and song lyrics. Lookingglass produced Thaddeus and Slocum and held the world premiere earlier this year. (“Highly recommended,” wrote Carol Moore in Around the Town Chicago. The play “is a certified hit in my book!”)
 
Krissy Vanderwarker, who co-directed Thaddeus and Slocum, said Douglas speaks highly of TCC and how it shaped him.
 
“He approaches his work with gratitude, thankful to have the opportunity to do what he does, but he also works tremendously hard,” Vanderwarker remarked. “He is always writing and dreaming the next project into reality. I admire his hustle and his grace.”
 
Those qualities were on full display when Douglas returned to TCC in 2014. Durapau was staging a production of “Around the World in 80 Days.” Since Kevin played the role of Passepartout in Laura Eason’s traveling production, he visited and helped coach the students.
 
“He brought with him a joy and was a natural teacher,” Durapau said. “Kevin has absolutely every gift you hope a person who goes into this profession would have. He manifests an incredible spirit that makes people want to work with him again and again.”
 
It is that spirit, as much as his talent, that allowed him to flourish in a notoriously unpredictable field.
 
“Choose your path and work hard for it. Nothing is easy. If it’s easy, I would question it—or at least ride it out cautiously,” he smiled. “It’s going to be challenging, but don’t let the challenges deter you. The challenges and letdowns build character.”
 
This story is the latest in a series celebrating members of the TCC community who don’t let challenges stop them. Follow these links to read previous features: Salma Alvarez, Celia Mwakutuya, Jessica Caudle, Ken Moak and Melora Werlwas.

TCC Announces Fall Fine Arts and Visual Arts Events

FORT WORTH, Texas (Oct. 11, 2016) – In keeping with its commitment to excellence in the arts, Tarrant County College offers opportunities to enjoy and learn from artists in dance, drama and music as well as visual art exhibits across the District this fall.
 
The Water Engine opens Oct. 12 and runs through Oct. 15 at the C.A. Roberson Theatre at the Southeast Campus, 2100 Southeast Parkway, Arlington. The drama tells the story of Charles Lang, a press operator who develops an engine that runs on water, and the challenges he faces while attempting to patent his invention. TCC students, faculty and staff attend free of charge, non-TCC students and senior adults, $3 and general admission, $6. Show times are 7:30 p.m. nightly and 1:30 p.m. on Saturday.
 
The Northwest Campus, 4801 Marine Creek Parkway, invests in younger students when Mosaic Dance Project hosts several area high schools Oct. 26 through Oct. 28. Dance master classes will be taught daily and include Contemporary, Hip-Hop, Jazz, Modern and Swing/Musical Theater styles. Students also will attend dress rehearsals for “Mosaic in Motion,” which features eclectic works performed by Mosaic Dance Project. Performances on Oct. 29 at 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at Theater Northwest are available. TCC students, faculty and staff attend free of charge, non-TCC students and senior adults, $3 and general admission, $6. For more information, contact Lacreacia Sanders at lacreacia.sanders@tccd.edu or 817-515-7692.
 
TCC’s commitment to the community continues at the Northeast Campus, 828 Harwood Road, Hurst, when the NE Music Department and the Mid-Cities and Fort Worth Music Teacher Association team up on Nov. 11 and 12 for the first Chamber Ensemble Festival. The festival promotes chamber music for students of all ages. Performances include strings, piano and mixed ensembles. Audiences will see firsthand how students improve their musicianship under the master guidance of clinicians. The events are free of charge. For more information, contact Hsinyi Wang at hsinyi.wang@tccd.edu or 817-515-6255. Additionally, the Northeast Campus has a variety of musical events this fall, including concerts and recitals. Please refer to the events listing for details.
 
Chekhov Tonight! will be performed at the Joe B. Rushing Center for the Performing Arts at the South Campus, 5301 Campus Drive, Nov. 17 through Nov. 19 at 7:30 p.m. nightly. The drama performance features scenes written by Anton Chekhov and narrated by Richie Harratine. TCC students, faculty and staff attend free of charge, non-TCC students and senior adults, $3 and general admission, $6.
 
Art exhibits include “Ecuador and Galapagos,” currently available at the Northeast Campus in the Center Corner. The photography exhibit, which is a result of a collaboration between multiple departments, is in observance of Hispanic Heritage Month, and will run through October. Admission is free.
 
Starting Nov. 16, the Northwest Campus will offer “The Fab Four,” a student art exhibit. The unique, juried exhibition, gives four student artists each an entire wall to create a large-scale, site-specific work in the gallery with a budget of $100. The exhibition will be available through mid-December. Admission is free.
 
fine-arts-and-visual-arts-events-fall-2016
 

TCC Announces Spring Fine Arts Events

FORT WORTH, Texas (Feb. 12, 2016) North Texas residents can enjoy a varied selection of award-winning fine arts events in dance, drama and music this spring at Tarrant County College. A sampling of events:
 
Northeast Campus
 
The Northeast Campus (828 Harwood Road, Hurst) opens its 2016 Spring Drama Season with Comedy of Errors, Shakespearean comedy performances. It runs from March 2 to March 5 in the NE Drama Playhouse in the Northeast Fine Arts Building, NFAB 1205, with shows each night at 7 p.m. and a matinee on March 5 at 2 p.m. General admission: $6. Tickets for TCC faculty, staff and students with I.D. are free.
 
On March 7, the Northeast Campus Chamber Choir will perform a variety of works at a dessert theatre in the Student Center, NSTU 1615A. The concert begins at 7 p.m. and is free.
 
Northwest Campus
 
Theater Northwest, in the Northwest Theatre, Library and Offices Building, WTLO 119A, at the Northwest Campus (4801 Marine Creek Parkway), will present Home, featuring performances by the Northwest Dance Company and the Mosaic Dance Project. Nightly performances at 7:30 p.m. start March 31 and run through Apr. 2 with a matinee at 2 p.m. the same day. General admission: $5, students with ID: $1 and TCC faculty and staff: Free.
 
Also at Theatre Northwest, A Year with Frog and Toad opens on March 4 at 7:30 p.m. The Tony-nominated musical is based on books by Arnold Lobel. It follows the enduring friendship of cheerful Frog and grumpy Toad. In addition to the performance on opening night, there is a matinee on March 5 at 2 p.m. General admission: $6, non-TCC students and senior adults: $3 and TCC faculty, staff and students: Free.
 
South Campus
 
Madame President? premieres Feb. 18 at 7:30 p.m. at the South Campus (5301 Campus Drive), in the Joe B. Rushing Center for the Performing Arts, SPAC 1203. The original play was created by South Campus Theatre students investigating women’s rise to positions of power and the responses of those around them. General admission: $6, non-TCC students and senior citizens: $3 and TCC students with I.D., faculty and staff: Free.
 
Southeast Campus
 
The C.A. Roberson Theatre at the Southeast Campus (2100 Southeast Parkway, Arlington) features the Festival of New Plays, which showcases original 10-minute plays selected from the student playwriting competition. Performances run Feb. 17 through Feb. 20 with nightly performances at 7 and 8:30 p.m. and a matinee on Feb. 19 at 1:30 p.m. General admission: $6, non-TCC students and senior citizens: $3, TCC students with I.D., faculty and staff may attend for free.
 
Dance Works, the Spring 2016 dance concert, also at the C.A. Roberson Theatre, features the SE Campus resident dance company, Rhapsody, and showcases the campus’ spring semester movement-based dance courses. General admission: $6 to $8. TCC students with I.D., faculty and staff: Free.
 
Fine Arts Events – Spring 2016
 

NE Faculty Member Plays at Residence of the Ambassador of Colombia

Eduardo Rojas, adjunct faculty member at the Northeast Campus, performed a piano concert at the Residence of the Ambassador of Colombia in October. An accomplished pianist, Rojas performed as part of The Embassy Series, which features concerts at embassies and ambassador residences in Washington, D.C.
 
He has previously played with the National Symphony Orchestra of Colombia, Bogota Philharmonic, Valle Philharmonic, Panama National Orchestra, Colombia Youth Philharmonic Orchestra, Van Cliburn Foundation, New Philharmonic Orchestra of Irving, Great Lakes Symphony, American Wind Symphony, Manitowoc Symphony Orchestra, Flower Mound Orchestra, Dallas Winds, Orpheus Chamber Singers and Dallas Chamber Symphony among others.
 
Northeast Campus Music Department Chair Karen Parsons says students are privileged to work with Rojas, who “is equally at home with the works of Beethoven and Rachmaninoff as with those of Argentinian composer Astor Piazzolla.”
 
In addition to teaching at Tarrant County College, Rojas is founder of the Rojas School of Music and was recently appointed as International Bosendorfer Artist.
 
Rojas Program
 

TCC Announces Fall Visual Arts Exhibits, Events

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
 
TCC Announces Fall Visual Arts Exhibits, Events
 
FORT WORTH, Texas (Oct. 30, 2015) Consistent with its commitment to enrich the community, Tarrant County College campuses are hosting a number of visual arts exhibits this fall.
 
The Lakeview Gallery at the Northwest Campus, located at 4801 Marine Creek Parkway, is showing “Austerity Revisited,” an exhibit by Steve Hilton that blends art and geology. A former science teacher and geologist, Hilton said his art is influenced by his appreciation of the erosional and depositional means through which plants, animals and weather influence the Earth’s surface. The closing reception, from noon to 2 p.m. on Nov. 6, will feature an Artist’s Talk at 12:30 p.m. Starting Nov. 9, selected Northwest Campus art students will showcase their works in an exhibit called, “No Boundaries.” The exhibit runs through Dec. 11. For more information on these exhibits, contact Winter Rusiloski at 817-515-7311 or winter.rusiloski@tccd.edu.
 
“Paintings After Proust” by Claudia Baez opens Nov. 12 at the Carillon Gallery at the South Campus, located at 5301 Campus Drive. The exhibit extends through Dec. 10. A longtime admirer of writer Marcel Proust, Baez created her own Proust-related series that reimagines cultural references with layers that engage the text and images that are personal. The opening reception takes place opening day from 6 to 8 p.m. For more information, contact Joshua Goode at 817-515-4641 or joshua.goode@tccd.edu.
 
Art Corridor II at the Southeast Campus, 2100 Southeast Parkway, Arlington, currently features artist Vicki Meek’s work, “Blues Talk: It Ain’t No Cliché Chit-Chat.” The exhibit, which examines the relationship between the blues and overcoming hardship, is a collaboration among the artist and various poets. The exhibit closes Nov. 30. Contact Christopher Blay at 817-515-3406 or christopher.blay@tccd.edu for more information.
 

TCC Announces Fall Fine Arts Events

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
 
TCC Announces Fall Fine Arts Events
 
FORT WORTH, Texas (Oct. 27, 2015) Tarrant County College offers opportunities to enjoy dance, drama and music across the District this fall.
 
Continuing through Nov. 19, the Northeast Drama Playhouse will host the 10th annual Children’s Outreach Musical. K-fourth grade children from the community can enjoy multiple performances of Oz, featuring Northeast Campus drama students. Performances will take place at the Northeast Campus, 828 Harwood Rd., Hurst. Drama teams also will be performing at select schools in the area. Tickets are free but reservations are required. To make reservations, contact Jacob Cabe at 817-515-6181 or jacob.cabe@TCCD.edu.
 
The Nosemaker’s Apprentice: Chronicles of a Medieval Plastic Surgeon, starts at the Joe B. Rushing Center for the Performing Arts at the South Campus, 5301 Campus Drive, on Nov. 19 at 7:30 p.m. The play tells the tale of Gavin, an orphan who is rescued from a workhouse when he has the opportunity to apprentice for a nosemaker, who becomes a renowned plastic surgeon. Tickets are $6 for general public admission and $3 for non-TCC students and senior adults. TCC students, faculty and staff may attend for free.
 
Theatre Northwest will feature Lone Star & Laundry and Bourbon from Dec. 1 to Dec. 6 at the Northwest Campus, 4801 Marine Creek Pkwy. The two hysterical tales about husbands, wives, war, love and honor give a snapshot of life in Maynard, Texas in 1974. Performances begin at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday and 2:00 p.m. on Sunday. Tickets are $6 for general public admission and $3 for non-TCC students and senior adults. TCC students, faculty and staff may attend for free.
 
A concert showcasing the Southeast Campus movement-based dance courses and resident dance company, Rhapsody Movement Company, will take place Dec. 10 and Dec. 11 at 7:30 p.m. in the C.A. Roberson Theatre, 2100 Southeast Pkwy., Arlington. General admission tickets are $5. TCC students, faculty and staff may attend for free.
 
Fine Arts Events – Fall 2015
 

TCC Trinity River Hosts Imagination Fort Worth

WHAT:
For the fifth consecutive year, Tarrant County College will host Imagination Fort Worth, a special weekend for the Deaf. Designed to provide hands-on workshops in the visual and performing arts to hundreds of deaf and hard-of-hearing high school students from across Texas, the weekend also provides opportunities for students to see successful deaf artists in action. More than 450 student and teachers are expected to attend.
 
Artists scheduled to appear include:
 
National Theatre for the Deaf – In existence since 1967, the drama group consisting of hearing and deaf actors has toured the world. Each performance uses American Sign Language (ASL) and the spoken word simultaneously.
 
Peter Cook – Internationally recognized deaf storyteller and poet Peter Cook will present his unique blend of ASL acting and movement.
 
Fred Beam – Professional actor, choreographer and director, founded Invisible Hands International, an award-winning non-profit that promotes Deaf culture awareness through art and entertainment, in 1989.
 
Amber Galloway Gallego – Renowned ASL interpreter who specializes in music and is in high demand at music festivals including Austin City Limits and Lollapalooza. She has interpreted for numerous artists, including Lady Gaga, Madonna and Paul McCartney.
 
WHEN:
Friday, April 10, noon to 4:30 p.m.
Saturday, April 11, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
 
WHERE:
Trinity River Campus, 300 Trinity Campus Circle, Fort Worth, 76102
 
EVENT CONTACTS:
Sammie Sheppard
Tarrant County College
sammie.sheppard@tccd.edu
817-515-1333
 
Lauri Bevan
Imagination Fort Worth
lbevan@icfw.org
817-870-1141
 
INTERVIEW INFORMATION:
 
For media interviews, please RSVP to Kendra Prince, 817-515-1546, by 11:30 a.m., Friday, April 10.
 

TCC Announces Spring Fine Arts Events

FORT WORTH, Texas (Feb. 12, 2015) Tarrant County College will offer a wide range of fine arts events in dance, drama and music this spring.
 
Northeast Campus
The Brock McGuire Band performs March 2 at 7 p.m. in the Larry Darlage Center Corner (NSTU 1615A) at the Northeast Campus (828 Harwood Road, Hurst). The band, which hails from Ireland, includes Irish music as well as American Old Timey, Bluegrass, French-Canadian and other Celtic arrangements in its repertoire. The Northeast Campus also will offer “Music Through the Centuries” on Apr. 7 at 7 p.m. The traveling concert starts at Larry Darlage Center Corner. Audience members will be escorted from room to room to hear live music from different eras.
 
Northwest Campus
Starting Apr. 9 at 7:30 p.m., the Northwest Dance Company and Mosaic Dance Project will perform in “A Return to Home” in the Theater Northwest, WTLO 119A, at the Northwest Campus (4801 Marine Creek Parkway). Nightly performances run through Apr. 11 with a matinee at 2 p.m. the same day. General admission, $5; Students with ID, $1; and TCC Faculty and Staff are free.
 
South Campus
Fools, a comic fable about a school teacher struggling to lift the curse of stupidity placed on the citizens of a long-ago Russian village, will premiere Apr. 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Joe B. Rushing Center for the Performing Arts at the South Campus (5301 Campus Drive). General Admission, $6; Non-TCC Students and Senior Citizens, $3; and TCC Students, Faculty and Staff are free.
 
Southeast Campus
Oscar Wilde’s classic story, The Importance of Being Earnest, runs Apr. 22 through Apr. 25 at the C.A. Roberson Theatre at the Southeast Campus (2100 Southeast Parkway, Arlington) with nightly performances at 7:30 p.m. and matinees on Apr. 23 and Apr. 24 at 1:30 p.m. The characters’ problems are resolved in charming and unexpected ways as they discover the importance of being earnest. General Admission, $6; Non-TCC Students and Senior Citizens, $3; and TCC Students, Faculty and Staff are free.
 
Fine Arts Events – Spring 2015
 

TCC Announces Spring Visual Arts Exhibits

FORT WORTH, Texas (Feb. 10, 2015) Tarrant County College is hosting a number of visual arts exhibits across the District this spring.
 
Former faculty member Eduardo Aguilar has two retrospective exhibits showing at the Lakeview Gallery at the Northwest Campus (4801 Marine Creek Parkway) and the Connections Gallery at the Trinity River Campus (300 Trinity Campus Circle). The exhibits, which run through Mar. 28, highlight Aguilar’s paintings, drawings and sculptures from four decades of artistry.
 
“The Idyllist” by Ryder Richards opens Mar. 5 at the Carillon Gallery at the Joe B. Rushing Center at the South Campus (5301 Campus Drive). The event, listed as one of the “Best Spring Arts Events 2015 in DFW” by Examiner.com, features Ryder Richards, who is known for creating ideas through art that challenge viewers to look at themselves and their relationships to the world differently.
 
The Southeast Campus, Art Corridor II (2100 Southeast Parkway, Arlington), will host “IPSEITY,” an exhibit with works by Alison Jardine and Liz Trosper from Mar. 19 through Apr. 19. Jardine creates her work with camera, computer and film and explores memory, absence and visual experiences using the motif of light. Trosper’s art emphasizes the hand and incorporates drawing, painting and digital media.
 

Visual Arts Events for TCC Spring 2015