TCC Launches Health Care Lecture and Workshop Series: “The River Speaks”

Friday, Nov. 18, 8:30 a.m. to noon
Trinity River Campus East, 245 E. Belknap Street, Fort Worth 76102
 

FORT WORTH, Texas (Nov. 17, 2016) – Renowned health care professionals will focus on contemporary health care issues and their impact on the industry during the inaugural Trinity River Speaks Lecture and Workshop series Friday at Tarrant County College Trinity River Campus East. Breakfast and networking will begin at 8:30 a.m.
 
After TCC Chancellor Eugene Giovannini and Trinity River Campus President Sean Madison conclude their opening remarks, Joshua W. Gatson, Ph.D., assistant professor at UT Southwestern Medical Center’s Neurological Surgery in the Burns, Trauma Critical Care Division, will give the opening keynote at 9 a.m. Gatson will speak about “Traumatic Brian Injury Critical Care and Implications for Health Care Professionals.”
 
Sponsored by TCC’s Division of Health Care Professions, the lecture series will provide health care students from various colleges and universities the opportunity to learn firsthand from and interact with key leaders and practitioners in the health care workforce, public health sectors and medical research centers.
 
“Trinity River Campus is presenting its first colloquium for inter-professional education. The conference will unpack the latest research advancements in the treatment of neurological conditions,” said Joseph Cameron, TCC Dean of Health Care Professions. “It will also review neurological case scenarios, focusing on community and public health, as well as highlighting nursing neuroscience practices and clinical care perspectives.”
 
Health care professionals from throughout the Dallas-Fort Worth area are invited to join TCC faculty and students from educational disciplines including Nursing, Health Information Technology, Long Term Care Administration, Surgical Technology, Radiologic Technology, Respiratory Care and Physical Therapist Assistance as they glean firsthand knowledge from the “best of the best in their areas of expertise,” Cameron said.
 
Other topics to be discussed include:

  • “Healthy Lives Matter and the Importance of Public Health Volunteerism,” presented by Alzheimer’s Association Program Manager Shelly Young and Leon Polk and Roderick Miles from the office of Tarrant County Commissioner Roy Brooks.
  • “Zika and the Brain,” presented by Tarrant County Public Health Director Vinny Taneja.
  • “Neuroscience Nursing Practice and Scenarios,” presented by Linda Martin, D.N.P., associate professor of professional practice, Texas Christian University Nursing Harris College of Nursing and social worker Dominicia Morgan, Brentwood Health.

Lectures are free and open to the public. Registration is required to ensure seating and parking accommodations. Register at: www.theriverspeaks.com.
 

Follow Tips to Fight the Flu

Boxing flu germIt’s that time of year again: Flu season.

That’s right.  It’s the time of the year when we give glares to anyone near us that dare cough or clutch a fistful of tissues as though they were their last hope.  The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) likes to remind us, though, that we can help reduce our chances for contracting the flu by following a few key steps:

  1. First, get a flu shot.  Many local clinics will be offering them.
  2. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  3. Cough or sneeze into your sleeve and elbow rather than your hands.
  4. Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  5. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  6. Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  7. If you are sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.)
  8. While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  9. Try to avoid crowds during an influenza outbreak.

To learn more about influenza, check out the CDC’s Flu Season section of their website.

Stay healthy this season!

“Hard work pays off:” TCC early college high school grad earns full scholarship to Johns Hopkins

TABS valedictorian and TCC graduate Rachelle Wanser.

TABS valedictorian and TCC graduate Rachelle Wanser.

For most students, college graduation comes years after they accept their high school diploma. Rachelle Wanser did things a little differently. In May, Wanser received her associate degree from Tarrant County College – one month before she took the stage as valedictorian of the Texas Academy of Biomedical Sciences (TABS).
 
“TABS is a very unique school,” says Wanser of the early college high school, a partnership among TCC, Fort Worth ISD, the University of North Texas and the UNT Health Science Center. “I felt excited to go to school every day. It was an experience that some people can only dream about.”
 
Her dreams just got a big boost. Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore awarded Wanser a full scholarship. She will be the first person in her family to attend a four-year institution of higher education.
 
“From there I aspire to earn my M.D. at Johns Hopkins, Stanford or Dartmouth,” she said. “My ultimate professional goal is to work either as a pediatrician in my own clinic or as a neonatologist in a hospital setting.”
 
TABS focuses on preparing students for a future in biomedical sciences or another Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) field. It is one of Fort Worth ISD’s “schools of choice,” with interested students participating in a lottery to gain admission. A friend told Wanser about TABS while she was in middle school at Fort Worth ISD’s Applied Learning Academy – which, like TABS, promotes a mix of real-world and classroom experiences. Wanser put her name in for consideration and became part of the very first TABS class, simultaneously becoming a high school and college student.
 
TABS students can begin taking TCC classes as soon as their freshman year and accumulate transferable college credits. They may get enough credits to earn an associate degree in addition to their high school diploma – a feat Wanser and five of her classmates accomplished this year. TCC is working to grow that number in future graduating classes.
 
“This is not school as usual,” says Troy Langston, TABS principal. “You have to be serious about being a student. You’re expected to work hard in college.”
 
In addition to completing core studies that meet state high school graduation requirements, TABS students take health science technology classes and other STEM courses as electives. Some of their TCC classes are composed entirely of TABS participants; in other courses, their peers are adult college students.
 
“That pushed me not only academically but also socially,” reflects Wanser. “I had to learn to be comfortable working with people who were sometimes far above me in age and who had a completely different worldview.”
 
In their junior and senior years, TABS students study exclusively at TCC’s Trinity River Campus.
 
“TABS was created to enable students to take courses that challenge their recognized talents, especially in the sciences,” says Dr. Tahita Fulkerson, Trinity River Campus president. “Rachelle extraordinarily exemplifies the possibilities of the program. She raised the bar for those who follow her.”
 
TCC waives tuition for TABS students, while Fort Worth ISD covers the cost of books and materials. Students receive support and assistance from UNT undergraduate and graduate students, and TABS upperclassmen visit the UNT Health Science Center and community healthcare facilities as part of their coursework.
 
“Our students come from all backgrounds. TABS is as diverse as Fort Worth,” says Langston. “It’s not uncommon for TABS students to be the first in their family to go to college. But 100 percent of our graduates plan to continue on to a four-year university or TCC this fall. In comparison, other Fort Worth high schools see 20 to 40 percent of their graduates enroll in college. That speaks volumes about the early college experience.”
 
Wanser credits TABS’ small class size, outstanding College faculty and hands-on approach to education with propelling her to success. But her instructors say her drive and tenacity also played a big role in getting her where she is today.
Rachelle Wanser (L) and Rio Velasquez learn about the anatomy of a cadaver frpm UNT Health Science Center.

Rachelle Wanser (L) and Rio Velasquez learn about the anatomy of a cadaver from UNT Health Science Center.


 
“Rachelle entered my classroom with an early understanding of what it takes to be a successful college student,” says Candice Torres, who taught Wanser Anatomy & Physiology I and Biology II. “She is dedicated, has an eye for detail, learns material quickly and has a strong capacity for critical thinking.”
 
Wanser’s principal agrees, noting that she took advantage of the resources TCC and UNT provide to TABS students.
 
“Rachelle kept focused on her education. She studied at night and took summer school,” Langston remembers. “She advocated for herself, asked questions and didn’t shy away from challenges.”
 
Wanser’s challenges were not only at school. For the last decade, her mother has suffered debilitating strokes. The cause is unknown, and the strokes happen at random times.
 
“I had to learn how to handle caring for my mom and two younger siblings while keeping up with schoolwork,” says Wanser. “Her illness is one of the reasons I want to become a doctor.”
 
Wanser is far from the only TABS graduate following her dreams with the help of a college scholarship. Langston says the class of 2015 – composed of just 87 students – received well over a million dollars in scholarship offers, a testament to the value of the program. When asked what she would tell other students considering early college high school, Wanser does not hesitate in her reply.
 
“Keep your spirits high. Courses are far more rigorous than regular high school classes, and it’s easy to feel overwhelmed. But when you make it through the tough times, the rewards are astounding. The hard work you put in now pays off in unimaginable ways a little further down the road.”
 
In addition to TABS, TCC’s early college high schools include Marine Creek Collegiate High School at Northwest Campus, Arlington Collegiate High School at Southeast Campus and the Grapevine-Colleyville ISD Collegiate Academy at Northeast Campus. South Campus will open the Tarrant County College South/Fort Worth ISD Collegiate High School this fall.
 
The Wanser feature is the latest in a year-long series celebrating TCC’s 50th anniversary through the lives of its students. Follow the links below to enjoy previous features:
 
Stephanie Davenport, Lee Graham, Sammie Sheppard, Sultan Karriem, and Erin Casey.

TCC SE Dietetics Program Receives Full ANFP Accreditation

ARLINGTON, Texas (April 28, 2014) Tarrant County College’s Dietetics Program at the Southeast Campus recently received full approval from the Association of Nutrition & Foodservice Professionals (ANFP) for its Dietary Manager program. TCC is one of six ANFP-approved traditional classroom sites in Texas.
 
Students who complete TCC’s certificate of Dietary Manager may sit for the national certification exam to become a Certified Dietary Manager (CDM). Monica Escobar-LeBlanc, dietary manager program director and dietetics instructor, said 50 students are expected to enroll in the program, which begins in fall 2014.
 
The Dietetics Program at TCC first received developmental approval from the Commission on Accreditation/Approval of Dietetics Education (CAADE) of the American Dietetic Association (ADA) on July 1, 1977. TCC’s Dietetic Technology Program has maintained uninterrupted approval status since its approval in 1999. In addition, the Dietetic Technician program was recently cited by the Southern Association of Schools Commission on Colleges (SACSCOC) as having the best assessment plan for a technical program at TCC.
 
Currently, the program is the only accredited dietetic technician education program in the state of Texas. “It shows that TCC provides a rigorous curriculum,” says Escobar-LeBlanc. “Graduates of the program will be able to practice competently as an entry-level dietetic technician.” Only graduates from an accredited dietetic technician program are eligible to sit for the national dietetic technician, registered (DTR) credentialing exam.
 
More information about the Dietetic Technician Program is available from Christina Liew-Newville, MS, RD, LD at (817) 515-3187.
 
To learn more about the Certificate in Dietary Manager Program, contact Monica Escobar-LeBlanc, MS, RD, LD at (817) 515-3629.
 

HHS Secretary Sebelius to Join Tarrant County-Area Elected Officials to Highlight Upcoming Enrollment Events in Fort Worth

On Thursday, March 20, U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) Kathleen Sebelius will join Congressman Marc Veasey, Texas State Representative Nicole Collier, Tarrant County Commissioner Roy Brooks (Precinct 1), and Tarrant County College Chancellor Erma C. Johnson Hadley to highlight continued local efforts to enroll consumers in affordable health coverage in the Fort Worth area. Secretary Sebelius will join these Fort Worth area leaders to discuss the latest enrollment numbers recently released for Texas and explain where people can get more information and in-person assistance in the Fort Worth area.
 
WHO:
Kathleen Sebelius
Secretary, HHS
 
Marc Veasey
Congressman, U.S. House of Representatives (TX-33)
 
Nicole Collier
State Representative, Texas (District 95)
 
Roy Brooks
Commissioner, Tarrant County (Precinct 1)
 
Erma C. Johnson Hadley
Chancellor, Tarrant County College District
 
WHEN:
Thursday, March 20, 2014
9:45 AM CDT (Press encouraged to arrive early to setup)
 
WHERE:
Tarrant County College – South Campus, Student Center
5301 Campus Drive
Fort Worth, TX 76119
 

TCC Celebrates Women’s History Month

Tarrant County College campuses will observe Women’s History Month with a number of events and exhibits, concluding with the Annual Women’s Symposium Mar. 29.
 
“Everyday Superheroines” gets the month-long activities underway with an exhibit that highlights 40 amazing women who are everyday superheroines. Open from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mar. 3-21 in Art Corridor III at the Southeast Campus, 2100 Southeast Parkway, Arlington, the exhibit is free and open to the public. For more information, call 817-515-3595. The opening reception will be held Mar. 3, 1-2 p.m.
 
Mar. 5, “Fabulous Fun Day” takes place at the Northeast Campus in the Student Center, 828 Harwood Road, Hurst, from 12:30-1:30 p.m. The event is geared toward those in need of pampering, insights into health and personality and a chance to connect with others on campus. Services offered include hand and stone massage, hair and makeup consulting and vascular testing.
 
Theresa Schrantz, assistant psychology professor at the Trinity River Campus, will discuss enhancing the world through service in the Student Center Living Room at the South Campus, 5301 Campus Drive, on Mar. 6. The event takes place from 12:30 to 1:45 p.m. Tickets are $5 for students and $7.50 for others. Those interested are encouraged to get tickets as soon as possible. Contact: Treisha Light at 817-515-4740 or Kathy Burks at 817-515-4470.
 
On Mar. 20 and 24, “Wonder Women! The Untold Story of American Superheroines” will be shown in the ESCT Hub at the Southeast Campus. The film traces the fascinating evolution and legacy of Wonder Woman. From the birth of the comic book superheroine in the 1940s to the blockbusters of today, “Wonder Women!” looks at how popular representations of powerful women often reflect society’s anxieties about women’s liberation.
 
Click on the link for a list of Women’s History Months Events at TCC:
 
Women’s History Month Events at TCC – Spring 2014
 

TCC Hosts Health Insurance Marketplace Enrollment Site

In Texas, there are more than 5 million people who currently are without health insurance. A large percentage of the 5+ million are 18-35 years of age.  Tarrant County College students who wish to enroll for health insurance will be able to learn about their options on Nov. 14 and Nov. 15.

 

CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) will be on each of TCC’s five campuses from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. to educate students about their insurance options and to help them navigate the enrollment process should the students so choose.

 

On each of the two days, CMS will host two informational sessions (including a question and answer period).  Navigators will be on hand to help student enroll either online or via paper application.

 

CMS is providing education and enrollment assistance across our region to a variety of audiences. As a federal agency, CMS offers unbiased information regarding the statutes under which the Marketplace operates.  They are not agents or brokers, do not charge for this service, nor are they compensated by any health insurance plan for what they do.

 

TCC campuses and addresses are: Northeast, 828 W. Harwood Road, Hurst; Northwest, 4801 Marine Creek Parkway; South, 5301 Campus Drive; Southeast, 2100 Southeast Parkway, Arlington; and Trinity River, 300 Trinity Campus Circle.

 

More information is available from TCC’s CMS contact Gaye Humphrey, outreach specialist, at gaye.humphrey@cms.hhs.gov or 214-767-6455.

TCC Employee Sets Cowtown Marathon Record

A TCC employee has accomplished two major feats in just a couple of weeks. Elizabeth Eder joined our staff in the Institutional Research Department on February 11, and she set a new Cowtown Marathon record on February 24.

While we’d like to believe that becoming a TCC employee was the inspiration Elizabeth needed to achieve a Cowtown Marathon best, as well as a personal best, we suspect that it was the months of hard work that had more to do with it.

Elizabeth credits a disciplined training regimen and a perfect day where everything fell into place for her time of 2:46.09, breaking the previous women’s record by almost 20 minutes and beating her own personal best by almost 10 minutes.

“I had to change my training quite a bit this time around, and the weather was unbelievable,” she said. “I had a few things going my way [Sunday], which made it really nice, and I had a great support group; so I was very pleased.”

Miles Upon Miles of Preparation

Running every day — sometimes twice a day — rain or shine, averaging more than 80 miles per week, and exceeding 100 miles one week helped Elizabeth reach this important milestone for competitive runners.

” It’s all about time management, and then pulling yourself out of bed when it’s raining, or if it’s cold, and you just gotta do it,” she said.

She was about halfway through the 26-mile run when she realized she had a chance to break the record.

“I was more concerned with hitting a personal goal of mine, and I kind of realized I was heading in that direction,” she said. “After the halfway point I still felt great, and so from there I just kind of let everything go and did my best; and the last half went really well.”

Dreams of Competing on the Olympic Level

If she shaves off three more minutes in a future race, she’ll be eligible to achieve a lifelong goal, competing in the 2016 Olympic trials.

It’s kind of what people equate to running in the Boston [Marathon] or running in the New York [Marathon], and it’s hard to achieve,” she said. “But it’s one of those big, big races that would just be unbelievable to compete in. I don’t care if I finish last place.”

When asked how she even managed to show up to work the day after such a physically grueling challenge, she replied, “I took the elevator, how about that?”

You can read more about the Cowtown Marathon and see a gallery of pictures at Star-Telegram.com.

It’s the Worst Time of the Year for the Flu

Girl sneezing into a Kleenex.It’s that time of year again!  No, I don’t mean the holidays (though true, those are quickly bearing down upon us).  I mean Flu Season. [insert scary music here]

That’s right.  It’s the time of the year when we give glares to anyone near us that dare cough or clutch a fistful of tissues as though they were their last hope.  The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) likes to remind us, though, that we can help reduce our chances for contracting the flu by following a few key steps:

  1. First, get a flu shot. TCC still has a supply of this year’s vaccine. It is available from each campus nurse at a cost of $12. Vouchers for the vaccine may be purchased from any campus business services office.
  2. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
  3. Cough or sneeze into your sleeve and elbow rather than your hands.
  4. Wash your hands often with soap and water. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
  5. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Germs spread this way.
  6. Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
  7. If you are sick with flu-like illness, CDC recommends that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone except to get medical care or for other necessities. (Your fever should be gone without the use of a fever-reducing medicine.)
  8. While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.
  9. Try to avoid crowds during an influenza outbreak.

To learn more about influenza, check out the CDC’s influenza information sheet or Flu Season section of their website.

Stay healthy and have a happy holidays!

Runners Ready for First Toro Dash

Toro Dash LogoThis coming Saturday, Tarrant County College will mark the start of a whole new tradition: the Toro Dash.

On Saturday, Dec. 1, runners will line up along the Trinity River and get their fitness on by partaking in the Toro Dash’s 5K, 10K, or 1 mile fun run. The morning’s events will begin at approximately 7:30 a.m. with a warm up session led by TCC’s own physical therapist assistant program.  The races, of which the first begins at 8 a.m., will be followed by an awards ceremony featuring music, food and beverages, event booths, and activities for all ages.

TCC is also using this opportunity to encourage participants to bring canned foods and other goods to help stock the Trinity River Campus student food pantry. The student food pantry began in April 2012 and is open to TCC students in need.  Any and all donations are welcome; canned soups, canned tuna, and snack items, such as granola bars, are particularly in high demand. Those unable to attend the race but who are interested in donating should contact Trinity River’s Administrative Assistant for Business, Economics, Management, Accounting, & Marketing Ruth Weatherford at ruth.coleman@tccd.edu.

Sponsors for the Toro Dash include RoadID, Subway Restaurants, El Paseo, Dick’s Sporting Goods, Sports Coverage, and MetLife. All proceeds will go to CASA, TCC Foundation’s Scholarship Fund, and TCC’s Wellness Fund.

If you’re worried you missed the deadline to register for the first ever Toro Dash,  though, don’t be; you’re in luck. On-site registration will be available for $30 the day of the race from 6:30 a.m to 7:45 a.m.. Make sure to give yourself plenty of time to park and make it to the registration site.

Happy running!