TCC Hosts Next Generation of Aviation Maintenance Professionals for Hands-On Competition

Students from across the region gather to demonstrate skills in high-demand field
 
FORT WORTH, Texas (Feb. 24, 2017) – Tarrant County College will host future aviation maintenance technicians from across the Southwest this month for the Professional Aviation Maintenance Association (PAMA) Aviation Maintenance Olympics. The event gives students an opportunity to demonstrate their skills in a field that is soaring in demand.
 
The eighth annual event will take place Saturday, Feb. 25, at the Erma C. Johnson Hadley Northwest Center of Excellence for Aviation, Transportation and Logistics—TCC’s training site at Alliance Airport. At 163,500 square feet, it is the largest aviation education facility in Texas.
 
Students from seven schools throughout the region—including institutions in Houston, Corpus Christi, Longview, Tulsa and North Texas—will take part in the competition, which includes parts assembly and installation along with safety techniques. All portions of the competition are hands on, with students using safety wire, hydraulic tubing, electrical conductors and more to showcase the speed, accuracy and expertise required of aviation technicians. Laboratory competition sponsors include American Airlines, US Aviation, Mair-Crafters Aviation, Tarrant Regional Water District, Ellis Precision Industries, Parker Hannifin/Aviall, Elbit Systems of America, Trimec Aviation, GE On-Wing Support, Broadie’s Aircraft, the DFW Chapter of PAMA and J & G Aviation; prizes are provided by Snap-On Tools.
 
The event provides networking opportunities and enhances students’ résumés.
 
“As the industry expands and technology advances, there is tremendous need for professionals who can safely and quickly take care of the worldwide fleet of aircraft,” said Darrell Irby, chair of TCC’s Aviation Department. “Our students spend countless hours preparing for their careers, and the PAMA Olympics are a fun way to put their skills to the test.”
 
To keep up with demand, the aviation industry will need more than 2 million new professionals through 2035—including 679,000 new maintenance technicians, according to the 2016 Boeing Pilot and Technician Outlook, an industry forecast. TCC offers associate degrees and certificates in aviation maintenance technology and airframe maintenance along with professional pilot training. For more information, visit the TCC website.
 
Media information: The competition runs 8 a.m. to approximately 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 25. Awards will be presented at approximately 4 p.m. Visits are recommended between 2:15 and 3 p.m. for the most visual elements of the Olympics.
 

Traveling World War I Museum Visits TCC’s Northwest Campus in Honor of War’s Centennial

Tuesday, Feb. 14 – Friday, Feb. 17
TCC Northwest Campus (4801 Marine Creek Pkwy., Fort Worth), WSTU 1305
Free

 
FORT WORTH, Texas (February 8, 2017) – As the United States marks 100 years since it entered World War I, a special exhibit is making a stop at Tarrant County College. The community is invited to visit the WWI 100th Anniversary Mobile Museum Feb. 14 through Feb. 17 at Northwest Campus. TCC is the first college to host the museum, which is in the middle of a four-year tour to commemorate World War I’s centennial (2014 to 2018).
 
The mobile museum, curated by Dallas historian Keith Colley, tells the story of the “War to End All Wars” and spotlights the life of Ernest Loucks. Loucks served in the U.S. Army and kept a variety of artifacts, many of which are part of the display. A tool used to help dig 25,000 miles of trenches dug in World War I; a movie camera on which soldiers filmed images from battle; British and American gas masks and two rare pigtail stakes that held barbed wire, used as a new form of warfare are included in the exhibition.
 
“This is a unique opportunity to gain a greater respect for our veterans who served in a conflict that truly changed the world,” said Laura Matysek Wood, Ph.D., professor of history and government. “Without any living World War I veterans, it is more important than ever to preserve and share this history.”
 
The exhibit is open to the TCC students, faculty and staff as well as the public. Admission is free. The museum will be set up in WSTU 1305. Hours are:
• Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 14 and 15, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
• Thursday, Feb. 16, 9:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.
• Friday, Feb. 17, 9:30 a.m. to noon.
 
For more information on the WWI 100th Anniversary Mobile Museum, visit ww1mobilemuseum.com. Details on the TCC exhibition are available from Laura Matysek Wood at laura.wood@tccd.edu or 817-515-7280.
 

TCC Announces Spring Fine Arts and Visual Arts Events

FORT WORTH, Texas (Jan. 31, 2017) In keeping with its commitment to excellence in the arts, Tarrant County College offers a variety of opportunities to enjoy dance, drama and music events and visual arts exhibits during the spring semester.
 
Those Before Me opens Feb. 16 and runs through Feb. 18 at the Joe B. Rushing Center for Performing Arts at the South Campus, 5301 Campus Drive. Researched and performed by TCC students, the drama honors women’s history. TCC students, faculty and staff attend free of charge. General admission is $5. Show times are 7:30 p.m. nightly.
 
The Festival of New Plays features three award-winning, 10-minute plays written by students who submitted their work in a playwriting competition last fall. Opening on February 22 and running through Feb. 24 at the C.A. Roberson Theatre at the Southeast Campus, 2100 Southeast Parkway, Arlington, festival performances are 7:30 p.m. nightly. A matinee at 1:30 p.m. on Feb. 24 will highlight an expanded version of MetAMORfosis, by Carlos Romero, last year’s first-place winner in the competition. The play will be performed at the Region 6 Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival in March. Tickets for the Festival of New Plays are free to TCC students, faculty and staff, $3 for non-TCC students and senior citizens and $6 general admission.
 
Students have a mystery to solve when MISS NELSON IS MISSING! premieres March 1 at the Northwest Campus, 4801 Marine Creek Parkway. The play, which continues through March 5, features Miss Nelson, a teacher who is just too nice and cannot seem to control her classroom. When she suddenly disappears, her hard-as-nails substitute, Viola Swamp, has her students ready to do anything to bring Miss Nelson back. General admission is $3. Show times are 7:30 nightly and 2 p.m. on Saturday.
 
A diverse cross-section of music, ranging from the Middle Ages to the contemporary era, will be performed March 28 at the Northeast Campus, 828 Harwood Road, Hurst. During the concert, audience members move through four rooms, each featuring a different era’s music. The concert, which is free of charge, begins at 7 p.m.
 
On March 29, the Southeast Campus will host a Swing Dance and Music Benefit, which features the TCC SE Jazz Ensemble playing traditional big band swing music. Dance instructors will be available to teach basic swing dance steps. An auction of art by TCC instructors and students will take place. Additionally, art will be available for sale. Guests are encouraged to dress in the style of the 1920s. Tickets are $5 for TCC students and $10 general admission. All proceeds will go toward scholarships for SE Campus Fine Arts students studying Art, Dance and Music.
 
Starting April 3, the Northwest Campus presents DADA Week, a celebration of the unlimited potential of human expression. The art exhibit shows how DADA connects all areas of study, including the rational and irrational. It is an example of thinking outside of what is expected and challenges students to invent new directions of their own. The exhibit will be available in the Lakeview Gallery through April 7.
 
Fine Arts and Visual Arts Events – Spring 2017
 

Legendary Coach and Motivator Herman Boone Takes Center Stage in TCC African-American Heritage Month Celebration

Image of Herman Boone

Herman Boone

FORT WORTH, TEXAS (Jan. 31, 2017) – Retired football coach and motivator Herman Boone, whose story is captured in the Disney film, Remember the Titans, will be the featured speaker for the Districtwide Tarrant County College African-American Heritage Month program, “Celebrating Strides,”  on Tuesday, Feb. 28, from 5 to 7:30 p.m.

 

Boone will discuss respect, teamwork, community involvement and the importance of character at the Hurst Convention Center, 1601 Campus Drive in Hurst. Academy Award-winning actor Denzel Washington portrayed Boone, who in 1971 faced the challenge of a lifetime in uniting black and white players from previously rival schools in the newly created Titans football team.

 

Other observances sponsored by TCC campuses include a Hip Hop Summit, other guest speakers and read-ins. Events are sponsored by various campus departments including art, libraries and student activities.

 

On Feb. 21 the Northeast Campus, 828 W. Hardwood Rd., Hurst, will host a “Hip Hop Summit” from 12:30 to 3 p.m. The Hip Hop Summit includes a discussion of the impact hip hop has had on America, particularly on Black America, and its significant evolution in style and rhythm during the past 40 years.

 

Students, faculty and staff members may benefit from have free music and dance instructions from the Bandan Koro African Drum and Dance Assemble

at the Northwest Campus, 4801 Marine Creek Parkway, on Feb 23. The celebration is from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Student Center, Refreshments will be served.

 

The Sigma Kappa Delta chapter at South Campus, 5301 Campus Drive, is sponsoring a Read-in on Feb 22 from 12:30 to 2 p.m. in the library. Jason Shelton, Ph.D., director of African-American Studies at the University of Texas at Arlington will speak and answer questions from the audience. Students, faculty and staff are invited to participate in the open mic event during which they may read passages from their favorite African-American writers.

 

Starting Feb 1, a month-long African-American Heritage Month Art Exhibit will be on display in the Art Corridor at the Southeast Campus, 2100 Southeast Parkway. The exhibit will display a visual timeline of the life of Martin Luther King Jr. along with African-American pioneers of the art community.

 

Author Max Krochmal will discuss his latest book, Blue Texas, Feb 23, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Tahita Fulkerson Library at the Trinity River Campus, 300 Trinity Campus Circle. Krochmal’s presentation, will cover the book’s tale of the decades-long struggle for democracy in Texas. It includes the uniting of African Americans, Mexican Americans and white labor and community activists to empower the state’s marginalized minorities.
 

Calendar of TCC African-American Heritage Month Events

 

TCC Students to Connect with Four-Year Colleges and Universities

A TCC student talks with a University representative during the Transfer Fair.

A TCC student talks with a UT Arlington representative during a 2016 Transfer Fair.

FORT WORTH, Texas (Jan. 17, 2017) – Tarrant County College will host a series of university transfer fairs to help students take the next step in their academic journeys. Beginning Monday, Jan. 23, students on all six campuses will have the opportunity to meet with representatives from more than 50 four-year colleges and universities.

 

More than 40 percent of TCC students start their college careers at TCC with the intent of transferring to a four-year institution. Through the Transfer Fairs, students will have the opportunity to find a four-year college that best fits their major goals and interests so they can transfer smoothly once they have completed their associate degree. The events are planned in conjunction with the Texas Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers.

 

Some of the colleges and universities scheduled to send representatives include Colorado Christian University, Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising, Louisiana Tech University, Midwestern State University, Southern Methodist University, Tarleton State University, Texas A&M University, Texas Christian University, Texas State University, Texas Tech University, The University of Texas at Arlington, The University of Texas at Dallas, University of Oklahoma, Wichita State University, along with a host of others.

 

The schedule, by campus and with contact information, follows:

 

Southeast Campus, 100 Southeast Parkway, Arlington: Monday, Jan. 23 – 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Commons, sponsored by the Advising and Counseling Center, 817-515-3590.

 

Northwest Campus, 4801 Marine Creek Parkway: Tuesday, Jan. 24 – 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., Student Center, WSTU 1303/1305, sponsored by the Transfer Center, 817-515-7524 or 817-515-7654.

 

South Campus, 5301 Campus Drive: Tuesday, Jan. 24 – 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Student Center Dining Hall, SSTU 1114, sponsored by the Office of Transfer and Scholarship Services, 817-515-4126.

 

Trinity River Campus, 300 Trinity Campus Circle: Wednesday, Jan. 25 – 8:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., Trinity River Building Main Street, sponsored by the Advising and Counseling Center and Transfer Center, 817-515-1198 or 817-515-1055.

 

Northeast Campus, 828 W. Harwood Road, Hurst: Wednesday, Jan. 25 – 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Student Center, Galley NTSU 1506 and north and south hallways, sponsored by the Transfer Center, 817-515-6234.

 

TCC Connect, 350 N. Henderson Street: Thursday, Jan. 26 – 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., virtual fair (http://bit.ly/TCC-Transfer-Fair-Session) or visit Trinity River Central Fork, TRCF 2101A, 817-515-1650. Some of the schools participating include: Capella University, Dallas Baptist University, Embry Riddle, Lamar University, Strayer University and Tarleton University.

 

Tarrant County College Celebrates the Season of Giving on Five Campuses

FORT WORTH, TEXAS (Jan. 2, 2017) Tarrant County College continued its tradition of giving back to the community with charitable events during the 2016 holiday season on five of its campuses. The holiday season gave each campus an opportunity to serve the community in a larger capacity.
 
The Northeast Campus Delta Psi Omega (Drama Club) sponsored Toys for Tots to benefit Cook Children’s Hospital. The Delta Psi Omega drive was supported by students, faculty, staff and members of the community.
 
Cowboy Santa’s benefitted in November from toys collected by Northwest Campus students, faculty and staff. The non-profit program provides toys to children under 12 from lower income Tarrant County families. More than 75 canned goods and more than 100 toys were collected and were distributed by the city of Fort Worth during the holiday season.
 
The South Campus Kinesiology Student Organization collected donations for Soles4Souls, a not-for profit-global social enterprise committed to fighting poverty through the collection and distribution of shoes and clothing. During the entire month of November students, faculty, staff and members of the community supported the drive to benefit children worldwide.
 
Additionally on the South Campus, groups collaborated with Trinity Habitat for Humanity to help build a home for a family in need in Tarrant County. More than 40 South Campus volunteers contributed with members of South Campus Men of Color Mentoring Program, Student Government Association, Cornerstone, and the African American Student Organization.
 
Trinity Habitat builds new homes, externally repairs existing homes and offers homeownership education classes and counseling services in partnership with qualified low-income families in Tarrant, Johnson, Parker and Wise Counties.
 
Southeast Campus hosted “Season’s Greetings”, the 17th annual Arlington Life Shelter Dinner. The turkey dinner, contributed by local donors, was prepared by the Southeast Campus Culinary Arts Department. More than 125 students, faculty and staff members volunteered for the event, including 30 students from the Arlington Collegiate High School located on the TCC Southeast Campus. Between 50 and 65 people were served at the dinner. Activities also were led on by various Southeast Campus clubs and organizations.
 
Trinity River Campus, sponsored several charitable projects:
• The gLove Project was sponsored by the Sigma Tau Surgical Technology Student Association. With the help of students, faculty and staff the gLove Project collected close to 3,000 gloves, mittens, hats, scarves and other winter apparel to benefit women and children at SafeHaven of Tarrant County, a nonprofit agency dedicated to ending domestic violence through safety, support, prevention and social change. Items will also be donated to Foster Children of Fort Worth and Grapevine Housing Authority which helps low income families with affordable housing.
 
• In collaboration with various Trinity River student organizations, the International Student Association collected more than 25 toys, 40 toiletries, 50 pieces of clothing and monetary donations benefiting Cooks Children Hospital, Tarrant County Food Bank and Opening Doors for Women and Needs. The #Dare2Give campaign took place in early December.
 
• Trinity River Equality in Education (TREE) collected more than 120 gift donations including a bicycle, toys, and clothing items in support of the Samaritan House of Fort Worth. The Samaritan House creates a supportive community providing housing and resources for positive change in the lives of persons living with HIV/AIDS and other special needs.
 

TCC Alum Navigates UNT Program for Veterans, Earns First Four-Year Degree in Family

The University of North Texas recently featured Johnathan Igou, a graduate of TCC’s logistics and supply chain management program, on the school’s main website.  Earlier this week, Johnathan, an Air Force veteran, received a bachelor of applied arts and sciences degree with a specialization in logistical operations, becoming the first in his family to earn a four-year degree. Mike Esquivel, coordinator of the logistics program at TCC Northwest, talked about Johnathan’s academic journey.

Read Johnathan Igou’s story. 

TCC Commits to Advancing Entrepreneurship, Supporting Innovation for Small Businesses

FORT WORTH, Texas (Nov. 29, 2016) – With a proven track record of awarding numerous credentials focused on entrepreneurship, Tarrant County College now is extending its commitment to cultivating an entrepreneurial culture in the Tarrant County community.
 
In November, TCC Chancellor Eugene V. Giovannini, Ed.D., signed the Presidents for Entrepreneurship Pledge—an initiative of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship (NACCE), of which Giovannini is board chairman. By taking the pledge, Giovannini signals TCC’s dedication to supporting future entrepreneurs on campus as well as local startups and small businesses.
 
“Entrepreneurship and innovation represent a powerful combination to create new economic opportunities and new prosperity across the region and throughout the country,” said Giovannini. “Because of community colleges’ accessibility and close ties to the community, we are uniquely positioned to support entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial methods on our campuses and in the surrounding areas.”
 
As part of the pledge, Giovannini and the College will expand internal and external teams dedicated to entrepreneurship; work to increase entrepreneurs’ engagement with TCC; incorporate industry trends into curricular planning; hold industry-specific entrepreneurship events; and, leverage College and community assets to support innovation and job creation.
 
The small business sector adds more net new jobs to the American economy than large businesses, according to the U.S. Small Business Administration. In the first three quarters of 2014, small businesses brought 1.4 million new jobs to the national marketplace. The most recent data show that small business openings are outpacing closures.
 
TCC offers the Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management Program, which allows students to earn an Associate of Applied Science, certificate or marketable skills award on Northwest Campus. Students are prepared to start their own ventures or continue their education at a university. Community and Industry Education Services provides an Entrepreneurship Certificate Program, a noncredit fast track to small business development skills, at South Campus.
 
More than 165 community college leaders across the country and internationally have joined Giovannini in signing the Presidents for Entrepreneurship Pledge. Learn more on the NACCE website.
 

What’s stopping you? High school students lead college honor society

(Pictured L-R) Zachary Stemple, Taylor Cattes, Kellis Ruiz

(Pictured L-R) Zachary Stemple, Taylor Cattes, Kellis Ruiz

By all accounts, Taylor Cattes, Kellis Ruiz and Zachary Stemple are doing an exemplary job leading the Northwest Campus chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, the international honor society for two-year colleges. As officers, they pulled off a perfect induction ceremony for new members in late November and are organizing service projects to benefit the College and the community—all while working toward their associate degrees, earning outstanding grades and planning their futures. And they’re reaching these accomplishments while they’re still in high school.
 
The Alpha Delta Delta chapter at Northwest is one of the few Phi Theta Kappa groups in the country whose officers include high school students. Cattes, Ruiz and Stemple attend Marine Creek Collegiate High School (MCCHS) on Northwest Campus—an intensive program offered in partnership with the Fort Worth Independent School District that allows students to simultaneously earn high school credit and tuition-free, transferable college credit. Students can earn up to an associate degree by the time they obtain their high school diploma.
 
“I have always held myself up to a high academic standard—a ‘school comes first’ philosophy,” said Cattes, a senior serving as Phi Theta Kappa president this year. “That’s exactly what I signed up for at MCCHS. I applied to the school because I was determined to succeed and better myself.”
 
“The opportunity to accelerate my education was very appealing,” added Ruiz, a senior and vice president of public relations. “The college-level classes are more challenging, promising and fruitful than just the high school curriculum.”
 
For Stemple, a junior and vice president of fellowship, the independence and responsibility that come with MCCHS enrollment was a big draw—as was the opportunity to save both money and time in his higher education experience. With a year of high school still to go, he will have 52 college hours at the end of the fall semester. Like Cattes and Ruiz, he is on track to earn an associate degree by the end of his senior year.
 
The trio’s desire to succeed also led them to Phi Theta Kappa. Membership is extended to elite students who have completed at least 12 hours toward an associate degree with a minimum GPA of 3.5; the organization recognizes academic achievement while building leadership skills. Phi Theta Kappa has recognized TCC’s chapters for their service-learning projects and outstanding members and advisors. Earlier this year, Alpha Delta Delta at Northwest earned Five-Star Chapter status—the highest designation a chapter can receive.
 
“Involvement in Phi Theta Kappa allows these students to develop professionally as they engage in scholarship, leadership, community service, collaboration and other areas that they will eventually have to mature in as students in higher education,” noted Ayanna Jackson-Fowler, Ph.D., professor of English and Phi Theta Kappa advisor. “The opportunities that Phi Theta Kappa gives these high school students are quite valuable as they transfer to a college or university in that they, in essence, will have a head start on developing professionally and be role models to their peers.”
 
Phi Theta Kappa membership is so valuable that the Fort Worth ISD Education Foundation funds membership fees for all MCCHS students accepted into the honor society.
“Fort Worth ISD students continue to excel and the Foundation is committed to helping those high achievers continue to the next level, especially when they have limited financial resources that may prevent them from advancing their academic goals,” said Mike West, Ed.D., board chair of the Fort Worth ISD Education Foundation.
 
At the end of spring 2016, all of Northwest’s Phi Theta Kappa officers were graduating. Briar Gorrell, who served as president of the chapter last year, encouraged the MCCHS students to take on more visible roles in the organization.
 
“They were excited and had a positive impact on every meeting,” remembered Gorrell, who is now studying nursing at TCU. “They wanted to be involved and were committed. You get back what you put into Phi Theta Kappa, and they put a lot into it.”
 
Cattes, Ruiz and Stemple went through the same application and interview process as other officer candidates. Gorrell says it was clear that the high school students were ready to take on the challenge.
 
“I was amazed by their capabilities,” said Gorrell. “When you have a student willing to do the work to get an associate degree while in high school, that says a lot.”
 
If the collegiate high school approach blurs the lines between high school and college, the MCCHS students’ leadership in Phi Theta Kappa almost erases them.
 
“The older students work very well with them and do not treat them any different based on them being younger and in high school,” remarked Jackson-Fowler. “As the older students work with these younger students as a team, there really is no distinction between the two groups.”
 
All the MCCHS Phi Theta Kappa officers say their participation is much more than a line on their résumés—they are honored to serve and are developing qualities that will benefit them in higher education and beyond. For Cattes, her role as Phi Theta Kappa president helped her overcome some nagging self-doubt.
 
“By being part of Phi Theta Kappa, I have become more confident and comfortable with myself, because I am surrounded by people who are like family to me,” she said.
 
Ruiz and Stemple have both grown as scholars since joining the organization. Stemple has acquired better time management skills that allow him to balance his studies and activities. Ruiz is learning to overcome chronic procrastination.
 
“I can only imagine the load that they have to carry as high school students taking college courses and being committed to Phi Theta Kappa,” noted Jackson-Fowler. “The diligence with which they have to achieve their many tasks has to be quite high. They are helping to form the standard for high school students that come after them into the Phi Theta Kappa community at TCC Northwest.”
 
All three plan to transfer to a four-year university after graduation from MCCHS. Cattes is interested in forensic anthropology and crime scene investigation; Ruiz wants to study anthropology and political science and earn his doctorate. Stemple plans to go into engineering.
 
Cattes, Ruiz and Stemple hope their roles as Phi Theta Kappa officers can inspire their fellow students to reach even higher.
 
“I think it reminds them that while we are still high school students, we really are college students too,” explained Stemple. “I would tell other MCCHS students not to hide on campus. Be proud of what you’ve accomplished. We can excel.”
 
Ruiz agrees. “Age doesn’t matter as much as your goals and determination.”
 
This story is the latest in a series celebrating members of the TCC community who don’t let challenges stop them. Follow these links to read previous features: Salma Alvarez, Celia Mwakutuya, Jessica Caudle, Ken Moak, Melora Werlwas and Kevin Douglas.

Tarrant County College to Introduce WEPA Campus Print System for Student Printing

 
wepa-print-solutionTarrant County College has partnered with wēpa (We Print Anywhere) to bring a new innovative print solution to all TCC campuses.
 
Beginning December 1, 2016, TCC students will be able to use the wēpa Print Solution to upload their documents to the wēpa print cloud from any computer, tablet, or mobile device with an internet connection. Students can also access cloud storage provider accounts and insert a USB drive directly at any wēpa print station.
 
Below are details on how it works and how to print.
 
Pricing

$0.10 Black & White Single-Sided
$0.18 Black & White Double-Sided
$0.50 Color Single-Sided
$0.80 Color Double-Sided

How to Print

  1. Upload your documents to the wēpa print cloud using your TCCD username & password.
  2. Login at any wēpa print station with your TCCD username & password.
  3. Print your documents.

Deposit Funds

Avoid point of sale transaction fees by using your credit/debit card to make a deposit into your wēpa account.

  1. At the print station select the “Deposit Funds” button and use your debit/credit card to add funds.
  2. At wepanow.com, select “Menu>Deposit Funds” and enter your debit/credit card information to add funds.

Traditional

One-time download: wepanow.com/printapp

  1. Open the document on your computer
  2. Choose “File>Print” and select either wēpa-BW or wēpa-COLOR; Select “Print”

Email

  • Using your school email account, email your documents to print@wepanow.com

Web

  • Go to wepanow.com/webupload
  • Drag and drop your documents and then select “Send to wēpa”

Cloud

  • Tap “Cloud Storage” at the print station
  • Select your preferred cloud storage provider
  • Enter your credentials

USB

  • Insert your USB drive
  • Select your documents and preferred options

Mobile

Apple App or Android App

  • Download the “wēpa Print” app from the Apple® App Store or Google Play®

Check out the wēpa YouTube page to view videos.