Tarrant County College Selects Barnes & Noble College to Manage Its Campus Bookstores

Retailer to Bring Cost-Saving Options, Expanded Services to TCC Students and Faculty

FORT WORTH, TX – Tarrant County College District (TCC) has named Barnes & Noble College, a Barnes & Noble Education Company (NYSE:BNED), as the new operator of its five on-campus bookstores. The Tarrant County College bookstores will transition to Barnes & Noble College management beginning July 18, 2017. This selection follows a Request for Proposal and TCC’s subsequent evaluation of three competitive proposals. This transition will require us to close the campus bookstores beginning at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, July 11.  The bookstores will reopen at 7:45 a.m. on Wednesday, July 19.
 
“Over the last four years, we have worked diligently to make course materials more affordable for our students,” says TCC Chancellor Eugene Giovannini, Ed.D. “With the selection of Barnes & Noble College, we will be able to offer students a robust in-store and online rental textbook program, an extensive selection of used, new and digital textbooks, OER Courseware and a price-matching program. In total, we believe this move will help our students save a great deal of money.”
 
Barnes & Noble College also will create and manage Tarrant County College’s online bookstore, designed to mirror the selection of learning materials and promotional items students, faculty and staff can purchase in-store.
 
Tarrant County College faculty also will gain access to a groundbreaking online community called FacultyEnlight (www.facultyenlight.com), a streamlined textbook adoption platform that combines advanced search capabilities with detailed information on course material formats, pricing and reviews by other faculty.
 
Tarrant County College is one of 29 higher education institutions in the state of Texas that partner with Barnes & Noble College, including Texas A&M, Southern Methodist University, San Jacinto College, Texas Tech University and the Houston Community College System. Barnes & Noble College operates 770 campus stores nationwide.
 
“We’re very proud to partner with Tarrant County College,” said Patrick Maloney, president of Barnes & Noble College. “This partnership will allow us to support TCC’s ‘Success Within Reach’ mission by offering students and faculty a multitude of resources, innovative technologies and an array of affordable course materials.”
 
For more information about Barnes & Noble College’s services and locations, visit www.bncollege.com. To learn more about Barnes & Noble College’s affordable textbook rental program, visit www.bnctextbookrental.com.
 
About Tarrant County College

Serving more than 100,000 students each year, Tarrant County College is one of the 20-largest higher education institutions in the United States. The two-year college offers a wide range of opportunities for learners of all ages and backgrounds, including traditional programs, such as Associate of Arts degrees, Community & Industry Education courses, workshops and customized training programs. The College has six campuses throughout Tarrant County, including TCC Connect, which provides flexibility with e-Learning and Weekend College. TCC also assists employers in training their workforces with its TCC Opportunity Center.
 
About Barnes & Noble College

Barnes & Noble College, a Barnes & Noble Education company (NYSE:BNED), is a leading operator of college bookstores in the United States. Barnes & Noble College currently operates 770 campus bookstores and the school-branded e-commerce sites for each store, serving more than 6 million college students and faculty nationwide. As a strategic partner, Barnes & Noble College is committed to offering a complete support system and an unmatched retail and digital learning experience to foster student success in higher education. General information on Barnes & Noble College can be obtained by visiting the Company’s website: www.bncollege.com.

CBS 11 Story Features Emergency and Crisis Preparedness Seminar at TCC

CBS 11 recently aired a story highlighting training that emergency and crisis preparedness professions received at an interactive seminar hosted by emergency preparedness experts with Tarrant County College and Alertus Technologies, featuring the Arlington Police Department. Reporter Brittany Jeffers provided details.
 
Watch the CBS 11 story.
 

What’s stopping you? When the hits kept coming, graduate and mom of four stayed focused on her goal

The pathway to TCC’s 2017 commencement ceremony was not easy for Ashley Calvillo. The mother of four children under the age of seven, Calvillo juggled family life along with school—and family life was anything but simple.
 
In fall 2015, Calvillo says she discovered toxic mold in her rental home. Her husband worked out of town, so Calvillo was solely responsible for their emergency move. Just when they were getting settled in with family, she found herself facing another crisis.
 
“My two-year-old son became very ill,” she recalled. “He was diagnosed with pneumonia and now has asthma as a result. He had several ER trips, an ambulance ride and a night in the hospital.”
 
While her son Dominic recovered, medical bills lingered, and at precisely the wrong time.
 
“As hospital bills started rolling in, the amount of work at my husband’s job decreased dramatically. He received only one paycheck in a three-month period,” Calvillo said.
 
Her husband found a new job closer to home, but took a significant pay cut in the process. The family is still recovering financially, staying with relatives to save money.
 
“It’s very difficult,” she admitted. “I have to remind myself that I’m not defined by my circumstances. I am taking care of my children, meeting all of their needs and investing in my education to better our future.”
 
Calvillo took a big step toward that better future this month when she received her Associate of Arts in Teaching for grades 6-12. It’s Calvillo’s second degree; she completed an Associate of Arts at TCC in 2013. And that one wasn’t easy to earn either.
 
“At one point I was nursing my firstborn, working full time and going to school full time,” said Calvillo. “It was a lot, but TCC was there for me. When I felt the call to teaching, I decided that TCC would be the best place to start because it was a wonderful experience the first time around.”
 
Surprised that this busy mom was able to complete her studies? Don’t be. Calvillo has been overcoming challenges since she was a little girl. At nine years old, she was in a rollover accident.
 
“Our vehicle lost a tire and flipped multiple times,” she remembered. “My mother was not wearing a seatbelt as far as I know.”
 
Calvillo lost her mother that day.
 
“Since I witnessed the accident, I suffer PTSD when driving. It is very hard for me to drive past car accidents as well,” Calvillo said.
 
But she manages to channel her grief and anxiety into something more positive: “It has encouraged me to always drive defensively, advocate for seatbelt usage and pass on the importance of vehicle safety to my children.”
 
Calvillo is honoring her mother in another way; teaching was her mother’s career goal. And those around Calvillo say she’s made for the profession.
 
“Ashley is passionate about her decision to become a teacher and motivated to succeed. She is very focused and driven, even in the face of adversity,” said Shereah Taylor, Ed.D., associate professor and coordinator of the teacher education program.
 
Taylor asked Calvillo to get involved with the South Campus chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, the international honor society for education. Calvillo immediately began taking part in the organization, attending meetings, literacy night at a local elementary school and professional development opportunities. This spring she helped organize the induction ceremony for new members. Involvement in Kappa Delta Pi had double benefits for Calvillo—she grew professionally and had something to think about besides the challenges at home. On campus and in the field, those challenges could be set aside.
 
“Whether she’s engaged in class dialogues or tutoring one-on-one with K-12 students, Ashley is entirely sincere and attached,” said Jeff Herr, Ed.D., adjunct professor of philosophy and education. “She has a knack for tuning in wholly and respectfully with all whom she encounters. This characteristic enables Ashley to understand the struggles of others so as to better aid in working toward solutions.”
 
Herr did not let Calvillo give up when circumstances started to feel like too much to handle.
 
“His class was more than a class,” Calvillo said. “It was an escape from the defeat I was feeling. If it weren’t for him, I wouldn’t have applied to walk at graduation. He made me realize I needed to walk because I worked so hard and deserve this.”
 
And walk she did on May 16 at the Fort Worth Convention Center, accepting her diploma with happy tears.
 
“I’m so relieved that it is done,” she said. “I’m going to look back on all those late nights, all the times my kids said, ‘Are you done with homework yet?’ and ‘I don’t want you to go to class’—I’m going to look back at all the obstacles and be so thankful that I finished.”
 
And while she finished her Associate of Arts in Teaching, Calvillo isn’t finished with her education. This fall, she will transfer to Texas Wesleyan University—on full scholarship—to work toward her bachelor’s degree in early childhood education. Her professors have no doubt that she will continue to succeed. It’s just part of who she is.
 
“Ashley sees the best in others. This mindset has helped to keep Ashley positive through the struggles and hardships that life has thrown her way,” Herr explained. “Her faith in a higher power and in the goodness of humanity drives her forward. Ashley knows what joy is and that she is a big part of making that joy come to fruition.”
 
This story is the latest in a series celebrating members of the TCC community who don’t let challenges stop them. Follow these links to read previous features: Salma Alvarez, Celia Mwakutuya, Jessica Caudle, Ken Moak, Melora Werlwas, Kevin Douglas, Marine Creek Collegiate High School students, students in atypical careers, Tre’Zjon Cothran , Karmin Ramosand Anthony Smith.
 

TCC to Graduate Record Number of ECHS Students

FORT WORTH, Texas (May 15, 2017) Tarrant County College will graduate its largest number of Early College High School graduates during its 49th Annual Spring Commencement on Tuesday, May 16. Two ceremonies will be held at 1 p.m. and 6 p.m. in the Fort Worth Convention Center, 1201 Houston Street.
 
One hundred-eleven students are receiving their associate degrees from two TCC Early College High Schools prior to receiving their high school diplomas. Students are graduating from Marine Creek Collegiate High School (MCCHS) located at TCC Northwest Campus and the Texas Academy of Biomedical Sciences (TABS) at TCC’s Trinity River Campus. TCC conferred its first associate degrees to Early College High School students in 2014 to 11 students from MCCHS.
 
A total of 7,566 TCC graduates are expected to receive 8,887 degrees and certificates for the summer and fall 2016 and spring 2017. The total is nearly 15 percent more than the actual 6,590 students who graduated in spring 2016. Of the number of degrees and certificates expected to be awarded this spring, more than 6,000 are being awarded because of TCC’s special outreach efforts to eligible graduates to ensure they know when they have met graduation requirements. An additional 225 are reverse-transfer graduates, meaning they have already graduated from four-year institutions.
 

Tarrant County College to Host 2017 African American Health Expo at South Campus

African American Health Expo.

10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Saturday, May 6
TCC South Campus Gymnasium, 5301Campus Dr., Fort Worth
South Campus
FORT WORTH, Texas (April 27, 2017) – Tarrant County College South Campus will host the 2017 African American Health Expo (AAHExpo) from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 6. This year’s theme is “Transforming: Our Lives. Our Health. Our Community.”
Open to the general public, this free event brings together various organizations and communities in and around Fort Worth to address the need for education, early detection, prevention, treatment and access to community resources.
 
Health screenings, seminars, cooking demonstrations and workshops will be provided. Guest speakers and industry professionals will be on-site to provide continuing education and answer health-related questions at the annual event. Participants can review their screening results with a health coach, who will also provide advice about how to better manage various health issues.
 
The morning will begin at 8 a.m. with the pre-expo breakfast focusing on “Breaking the Cycle of Disparities” sponsored by Moncrief Cancer Institute, will serve as an important precursor that will examine collective efforts to eliminate prevailing health disparities and promote health equity, encouraging attendees to see beyond disparities toward tangible collective action.
 
“The goal of the health expo is to educate students and community members about the wealth of resources available on and around campus,” said TCC South Campus President Peter Jordan, Ed.D. “Attendees will learn more about these resources and strategies that help promote healthy lifestyles.”
 
For more information and a list of participating organizations, email aahexpo@gmail.com or visit www.aahexpo.org.
 

TCC Invites Job Seekers, Recruiters to Community Job Fair

FORT WORTH, Texas (March 30, 2017) – Job seekers and area employers will come together at Tarrant County College Thursday, April 27, for the College-Wide Job Fair. The event is free and open to students, alumni and the community. It is hosted jointly by TCC’s South, Northeast, Northwest, Southeast, Trinity River and Connect campuses along with the TCC Foundation.
 
The fair takes place 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. at South Campus (5301 Campus Dr., Fort Worth, SSTU Dining Hall). Companies are recruiting for full-time, part-time and seasonal jobs as well as paid internships. Candidates of all industries and experience levels are encouraged to attend, dress professionally and come prepared with résumés.
 
The fair will feature more than 40 companies, including the American Airlines Training and Conference Center, AmeriState Claim Solutions, Ben E. Keith, ChildCare Careers, Fastenal, U.S. Customs and Border Patrol, Texas Department of Public Safety, Fort Worth Independent School District and Walmart Distribution Center.
 
“Whether you’re getting ready to graduate or just looking for your next position, the College-Wide Job Fair is a great opportunity to build important skills and get in front of some of the top companies in the region,” said Monica Miranda, coordinator of career and employment services on South Campus.
 
Job seekers can pre-register at tccd.edu/alumni or simply show up at the fair. Employers who wish to participate should contact Miranda at monica.miranda@tccd.edu.
 
The College-Wide Job Fair is co-sponsored by the American Airlines Training and Conference Center, AmeriState Claim Solutions and ChildCare Careers. Sponsors’ contributions benefit student scholarships and programs through the TCC Foundation.
 
In addition to the College-Wide Job Fair, recruiters from Billy Bob’s Texas will be at Northwest Campus Wednesday, April 5, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. (4801 Marine Creek Pkwy., Fort Worth, WSTU Hallway). Northeast Campus will host a military recruitment event during Spring Fest, which takes place Wednesday, April 12, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the campus lawn (828 W. Harwood Rd., Hurst). The Erma C. Johnson Hadley Northwest Center of Excellence for Aviation, Transportation & Logistics will host a job fair specific to those fields 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. Thursday, April 20 (2301 Horizon Dr., Fort Worth).
 

What’s stopping you? TCC alum makes sacrifices for education, earns national recognition

Karmin Ramos remembers the exact moment she decided to enter the construction sciences industry.

 

“I was watching HGTV and DIY with my parents and realized that I had a passion for construction,” said Ramos, who earned her Associate of Applied Science in Construction Management Technology along with two construction certificates in spring 2016. “I had flashbacks of me when I was a little girl making things around the house and knew I liked the process of constructing a project.”

 

The next day, Ramos was sitting in a TCC counselor’s office, sharing her career plans. She’d been at Tarrant County College for three years trying to figure out what to study. The counselor told her about the Construction Management Technology program, and Ramos enrolled the next semester. She earned an “A” in her first class and knew without a doubt that she had found her path.

 

But it’s not just Ramos herself who realizes she has a gift for the high-demand construction sciences. The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) recently recognized her with the Outstanding Student Award. She is one of 28 students in the country to earn the recognition at this year’s convention in Orlando, Fla. Students are selected based on their academic achievements, involvement with their school’s NAHB chapter and their interest in pursuing a residential building career. Orlando Bagcal, Ph.D., associate professor and coordinator of the Construction Management Technology program at TCC South Campus, nominated Ramos for the honor.

 

“Truly, Karmin is a remarkable example of a persevering student who wants to achieve her education goal
s and be successful in her chosen career,” observed Bagcal.

 

Ramos excelled in her studies while balancing a variety of activities: serving as an intern at top-ranked construction management company Linbeck, secretary of the Association of Construction Management Students (ACMS), student senator for the TCC South Campus student government organization and a community volunteer. But success meant some difficult decisions for Ramos. After two semesters in the Construction Management Technology Program, she had to make a decision between quitting her job to focus on school or continue working, which would prolong her graduation date.

 

Ramos wrestled with the choice. She had been full time with her company for nearly four years.

 

“Part of what made it difficult to leave my job was being used to the income, but it was mostly fear of the unknown,” remembered Ramos. “I had gotten so used to being independent and being able to pay for my classes and bills and helping my parents out that it didn’t feel right quitting.”

 

She turned to her parents for advice.

 

“They thought focusing on school was a great idea, because in their home countries of Mexico and Honduras, did not have the privilege of furthering their education,” Ramos said. “They told me they wanted to see me graduate more than anything and that they would support my decision.”

 

Ramos finally decided the she had been putting off school for too long and left her job.

 

“At TCC, I found something I really enjoyed and did not want anything to get in the way. I was worried how I was going to pay for my classes, but had faith God was going to help me.”

 

Her financial concerns were alleviated when Westwood Contractors offered her a scholarship. She was able to focus on her studies and career plans—and those around her took note. Bagcal said Ramos took ACMS to a new level, organizing and coordinating participation in Habitat for Humanity, the Cowtown Brush-Up and Adopt-a-Highway, among other activities. When it came time for Bagcal to make a nomination for the NAHB Outstanding Student Award, Ramos rose to the top of the list.

 

“She is an outstanding student—not only academically but also as a leader,” Bagcal said.

 

Despite her talents, the award and even the nomination were a surprise to Ramos.

 

“I did not find out I won until they called out my name during the ceremony,” she said. “Once I heard it I was so excited, I rushed to the stage.”

 

It was a big moment with lasting implications.

 

“Winning the award brought me a lot of hope,” Ramos reflected. “Sometimes you start to feel weary when you are going after your future. You start to forget everything you have accomplished and overcome. This award reminded me how important it is to set goals and to continue to pursue them no matter the obstacles you face or how exhausted you feel, because your hard work will pay off.”

 

That hard work paid off not only for Ramos but also for the ACMS organization, which placed second in the nation for the 2016 Outstanding NAHB Student Chapter.

 

Ramos is continuing her studies at TCC. She plans to get a job over the summer with a construction firm as a project engineer, scheduler or estimator before transferring to the University of Texas at Arlington to work toward a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering. Her career path is bright. The Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex is the largest metropolitan region in the southern United States, with more than 7 million residents. Projections call for continued population growth in the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington area, meaning continued demand in the construction industry.

 

Bagcal believes other students—whatever their area of study—can learn from Ramos.

 

“She was able to excel in both her studies and co-curricular activities,” he said. “Being in college is about not only academics—but at the same time being able to enjoy college life by getting actively involved and enhancing social and networking skills. Karmin mastered that balance.”

 

This story is the latest in a series celebrating members of the TCC community who don’t let challenges stop them. Follow these links to read previous features: Salma Alvarez, Celia Mwakutuya, Jessica Caudle, Ken Moak, Melora Werlwas, Kevin Douglas, Marine Creek Collegiate High School students,  students in atypical careers and Tre’Zjon Cothran.

TCC South Campus Hosts Hot Rodders of Tomorrow Engine Challenge

Hot Rodders of Tomorrow championship qualifying event at TCC South Campus.

FORT WORTH, Texas (March 23, 2017)

 

WHAT:

Tarrant County College South Campus will host the Hot Rodders of Tomorrow Engine Challenge, at which automotive technology students from Arkansas, Louisiana and Oklahoma high schools will race to tear down and rebuild an engine in a timed and judged competition. Four teams are competing for scholarships that can be used to pursue automotive degrees.

 

The Hot Rodders of Tomorrow Engine Challenge started in 2008 with five high school teams at one event in St. Charles, Illinois. Since then, it has expanded to include 110 teams, 770 students and 10 qualifying events around the country.

 

WHEN:

Saturday, March 25

9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

 

WHERE:

TCC South Campus

Automotive Building

5301 Campus Drive

Fort Worth, Texas 76119

 

EVENT CONTACT:
James Martin

James.Martin@tccd.edu

817-515-4785

 

NOTE:

Media are encouraged to call 817-515-1542 if planning to cover the event.

 

TCC Graduate Earns National Recognition in Growing Construction Sciences Field 

FORT WORTH, Texas (March 22, 2017) – The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) recognized Tarrant County College graduate Karmin Ramos with the prestigious Outstanding Student Award during this year’s convention in Orlando, Florida.

 

The award recognizes students with strong academic achievement, significant involvement with their school’s NAHB chapter, and an interest in pursuing a residential building career. Orlando Bagcal, Ph.D., associate professor and coordinator of the College’s Construction Management Technology program on the TCC South Campus, nominated Ramos for the honor. She was one of 28 students in the country to earn the recognition.

 

“Karmin is an outstanding student, not only academically but as a leader,” Bagcal said. “She is a remarkable example of a persevering student who wants to achieve her educational goals and be successful in her chosen career.”

 

Ramos excelled in her studies while balancing a variety of activities, including serving as an intern at top-ranked construction management company Linbeck, as secretary of the Association of Construction Management Students, as a student senator for the TCC South Campus student government organization, and as a community volunteer. She earned her Associate of Applied Science in Construction Management Technology along with two construction certificates in spring 2016. She is continuing her studies at TCC in anticipation of transferring to the University of Texas at Arlington to work toward a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering.

 

Projections indicate continued population growth in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex, which is the largest metropolitan region in the southern United States, with more than 7 million residents. According to the Texas Workforce Commission, employment of construction managers in Tarrant County is expected to grow nearly 20 percent between 2012 and 2022.

 

TCC offers a variety of programs preparing students to design, build and manage projects throughout North Texas and beyond. Students practice their skills through volunteer projects, such as renovations for nonprofit groups, Habitat for Humanity and repairs for homeowners in need.

 

The Construction Management Technology program is part of the Center of Excellence for Energy Technology located on the TCC South Campus. The facility includes a 1,800-square-foot construction laboratory for materials testing, soil testing and surveying as well as a full-size residential house mockup. For more information on the Construction Management Technology program, visit the College’s website.

 

TCC Celebrates Women’s History Month

FORT WORTH, Texas (Feb. 27, 2017) – Tarrant County College will commemorate Women’s History Month with numerous public events to celebrate the history, strides and betterment of all women.
 
TCC campuses will offer events that include health care services, informative visual displays, self-defense training and career building workshops along with panel discussions.
 
Northeast Campus, 828 W. Harwood Road, Hurst:
On March 22, the Northeast Campus will host a self-defense class led by Instructional Adjunct and 4th degree black belt Shane Whitehead from 10 a.m. to noon. The class will teach awareness, assertiveness, verbal confrontation skills, safety strategies and physical techniques that help participants successfully prevent, escape, resist and survive violent assaults.
 
Northwest Campus, 4801 Marine Creek Parkway:
The Northwest Campus Student Leadership Academy will present “Marketable Skills: Women in the Workforce,” a workshop designed to help students build successful life skills that may be translated into the workforce. The workshop will take place March 9, from 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m.
 
A poster exhibit sponsored by the Northwest Campus Empowering Links organization will spotlight empowered women in the Northwest community. The exhibit will be on display from March 27 to March 30 in the bookstore lobby.
 
South Campus, 5301 Campus Drive:
The Triesha Light Annual Women’s Symposium will be held March 4 from 8:30 a.m. to noon in the Student Center Living Room, SSTU 2105. The Behavioral and Social Sciences Division and the Student Activities Office sponsor the symposium.
 
During the entire month of March, the South Campus library will present a visual display with the theme of “Women in the Labor Force.” The display will highlight the history and significance of women in the labor force.
 
Southeast Campus, 2100 Southeast Parkway:
On Mar. 21 and 29, beginning at 10 a.m., the Southeast Campus will show the documentary Painted Nails, which follows the life of Van Hoang, a Vietnamese nail salon owner who testifies before the United States Congress about the need for safer cosmetics. On March 30, Sharon Wettengel, TCC Assistant Professor of Sociology, will show clips and lead a moderated discussion of the Painted Nails documentary. The discussion will begin at 10 a.m. in the library classroom.
 
Trinity River Campus, 300 Trinity Campus Circle:
Jackie Opollo, Ph.D., director of Professional Practice & Nursing Research at Parkland Health and Hospital System and professor of Nursing at the University of Texas at Arlington, will lead a discussion about the importance of care and compassion in nursing at the Trinity River Campus. The discussion will be March 1 from noon to 1 p.m.
 
On March 30, the Trinity River Idea Store will present “A Conversation with the CEO of Catholic Charities, Heather Reynolds” from noon to 1 p.m. Reynolds will discuss how Catholic Charites Fort Worth is working to eradicate poverty.
 

WHM Events 2017 Final