Trinity River Campus East Named in “Top 13 Texan Buildings to See in 2013”

Tarrant County College’s Trinity River Campus East was named in the “Top 13 Texan Buildings to See in 2013” by Architizer and The Texas Society of Architects.

Check out all 13 places to see on Architzer’s blog site.

Trinity River Campus East at night

 

Agreement Expands Access for TCC Students

Signing pose

Article updated June 18.

Thanks to an agreement signed earlier this week it will be even easier for Tarrant County College students to transition to Tarleton State University in Stephenville  to complete their education at the upper-level institution.

TCC’s Toro and TSU’s Texan, school mascots, along with TCC nursing students were on hand to witness the historic event that TSU President F. Dominic Dottavio called “a great day to be a Texan,” referencing both TSU students, Dallas-Fort Worth residents and those statewide.

The Memorandum of Agreement helps students connect with TSU in a way that “makes a difference in lives,” said TCC Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs David Wells during the signing ceremony in the auditorium at Trinity River East Campus in downtown Fort Worth.

Eligible students will be able to apply to a variety of university programs after completion of their associate degree. Students may apply to Tarleton online at ApplyTexas.org. In the Fort Worth region, students may visit Tarleton’s Southwest Metroplex Center at 6777 Camp Bowie Boulevard, Suite 500, for assistance with the application process. Additionally, it will allow students who have transferred to TSU to return to TCC to take additional courses when necessary.

Other components outlined in the MOA that will allow TCC and TSU to promote the success of their students in the common geographic region are: Dual Admission, Program Specific Agreements, Two-Step Program Agreements, Laboratory Medicine Consortium Agreements, Alternate Delivery of Baccalaureate and Graduate Programs and Non-Academic Consortium Agreements.

 

 

 

Tarrant County College Becomes a National TV Star

Surgical Technology Students

Surgical Technology students learn about surgical instruments with a little help from a "volunteer."

Set your alarm clock, or better yet, stay up all night to catch Trinity River East Campus Health Professions featured on The Profiles Series at 6 a.m. CST, Monday, May 21 on The Discovery Channel. [Read more…]

Campus Display Mystery Solved

Career Coach sign

It turns out the mysterious signs on all of the campuses were paving the way for Career Coach.

Those cryptic displays that popped up on every campus right after spring break have finally been explained. They were promoting TCC’s launch of Career Coach, a Web-based tool designed to help you get moving career-wise.

While some of you might be disappointed that the displays were not foretelling the arrival of a TCC sports team or a new TV show starring a ventriloquist and his wacky dummy friend, at least we can all rest assured that our mascot Toro was not involved in any foul play, as some of the grainy images posted of him on TCC’s Facebook page may have hinted.

Apparently, Toro was busy updating these displays on a regular basis, spray-painting the original “Dead-End Job” posters with stenciled coach icons and “Coming Soon” messages every few days to generate interest for the official launch of Career Coach.

Blow the Whistle on that Dead-End Job

If you’ve ever asked questions like, “How do I become a dental hygienist?” or “How much do welders make?” or “Are there any ventriloquist jobs around here?” then Career Coach can guide you through the steps with current data about local job trends, wages, openings, and the training or education required to get one of those jobs.

You can begin your search on Career Coach in one of two ways. You can enter a specific job title that interests you, and Career Coach will show you actual local data for earnings, employment trends, required education and training, and even real job openings within a 25-mile radius.

Or you can enter the name of a field of study you’d like to pursue, and Career Coach will show you the programs TCC offers in that area, as well as the kinds of jobs and paychecks you can expect to get with that particular degree or certificate.

Career Coach is Your Motivational Trainer

If you’re still having trouble deciding what you want to be when you grow up, Career Coach is a great place to start. Or, if you know what you’d like to do, but you just don’t know how to get there, Career Coach can map it out, step by step. But we’re just scratching the surface of Career Coach. Check it out for yourself.

If you’d like to schedule a live demonstration for your class or organization, please follow this link to the Career Coach Demonstration Request form, and a TCC career counselor can show your group how to get the most out of Career Coach.

Is Someone Trying to April-Fool Us?

Poster picture

One of the mysterious displays is in the South Campus Cafeteria.

Many of you may have noticed an unusual display that mysteriously appeared on your campus a couple of weeks ago. We’ve been told that they’re on every campus, and that the cryptic message is altered every few days.

The first appearance was right after Spring Break. It consisted of a four-foot poster that simply read, “Dead-End Job?”  To add to the dead-end effect, decals resembling tire treads were placed on the floor leading up to the wall, and the area was cordoned off with traffic cones and “Caution” tape.

On Trinity River Campus, the display was placed at the end of Main Street by the Riverfront Café, right where many Radio Shack employees veer off to the escalators to work in the West Building. This caused some of them to infer that it was management’s way of hinting at impending layoffs, which led to record attendance at Trinity River’s Job Fair on March 28, and a rush on linen-finish resume paper at the Campus Bookstore.

Many Northwest Campus students just assumed it was a setting for a performance-art piece to be presented during their upcoming Dada Day celebration on April 4.

Mysterious Changes

About a week later, a graphic of a coach holding a bullhorn and a briefcase was stenciled over the existing poster. This led some students to speculate that TCC was so desperate for adjunct instructors; they were even considering their old Middle-School P.E. teachers.

Boxes of adhesive stickers printed with the same icon were also left at the scene.  Last Thursday the displays were altered again with the addition of the words “Coming Soon.” We used our superior ciphering powers to theorize that whatever it is, we’ll find out soon.

An Elaborate April Fools’ Day Joke?

Given the timing of these events, we can’t help but wonder if it’s some kind of April Fools’ Day prank, but seeing that it’s now April 2, we’re beginning to rule out that theory, unless the pranksters behind this are really committed to next year.

Shadowy figure

We received this anonymous picture.

A Social Media or Sports Connection?

At about the same time, some really creepy photos of our beloved mascot Toro were posted on TCC’s Facebook page. We even received a grainy photo of a sneaker-clad bovine foot, a briefcase and a can of spray paint. Could Toro be tagging posters on campus to promote a new mobile app?

The graphic features a coach with a whistle. IS TCC starting up a sports team? The coach is holding a briefcase, too. Could TCC be hosting trials to send an Olympic accounting team to London this summer?

Whatever this means, we’ll all just have to wait until the coach’s “Coming Soon” prophecy is fulfilled.

Campuses Celebrate Women’s Accomplishments

Oil Paintings

You still have a few days to see works of art by TCC students, like these oil paintings by Liz Cantrell.

I read just the other day that the Y chromosome, the one that makes men manly, has only 78 genes. Compare that to the 800 or so in the female chromosome, and it’s obvious which gender is the dominant one. We invite you to celebrate that victory and countless others during Women’s History Month this March, when we pause to recognize the power of women and their contributions to society. Each campus has a variety of activities planned all month long, and here are just a few of them.

South Campus

This month marks the 35th Anniversary of TCC’s Women in New Roles program, designed to assist women who are in the transition of returning to school and provide strategies for personal and career changes. Now through March 1, stop by the Carillon Gallery at the South Campus performing Arts Center to check out works from 18 student artists in the WINR Program at the WINR Art Show — Celebrating the 35th Anniversary of Women in New Roles.

All month long, you can see the Women’s History Month Library Exhibit in the lobby area by the library. This year’s theme is Women Impacting Business.

Make your reservation to attend the Women’s History Month Luncheon, featuring WFAA reporter and anchor Shon Gables. Tickets are $5.00 for students and $7.50 for others. It will be held March 1 in the SSTU Student Center Living Room from 12:30 to 1:45 p.m.

On March 6, take in the WINR seminar Women in Leadership: Applying Leadership Principles in Multiple Roles, presented by Altheria Gaston, Dean of Business and Behavioral Sciences, from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. in the SSTU Texas Room.

Also on March 6, you can learn how to win and lose at a Brown Bag Luncheon with Tracey Yukich, a contestant from season 8 of the TV show “The Biggest Loser.” She’ll share how her experience on the show helped her make some life-changing decisions to take control of her destiny. It’s in the South Campus Gym from 12:30 to 1:20 p.m.

Altheria Gaston, South Campus Education Department Chair, will lead participants in an interactive seminar, In Honor of Women’s History Month, focusing on the value of women’s historical accomplishments March 7 from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. in the Texas Room.

Community Health Educator Judith Dillard will contribute to the Young Women’s Leadership Track March 19 with An Empowered Life is a Healthy Life, from 11:15 to 12:15 p.m. in the SSTU Texas Room.

Students may take a free one-session, non-credit course and see the DVD series A History of Women’s Achievements in America, which examines 400-years of American women’s inspiring accomplishments and victories in only 4 hours. The showing is March 23 from 5 – 9 p.m. in SACB 1210.

If you’re 35-years-old or more, you should consider regular mammograms. On March 27 a 70-foot mammoth mobile mammogram truck at the South Campus parking lot will offer free mammograms from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Call 800-405-7739 to make a reservation, or call Staci Smith at 817-515-4595 or Tina Ingram at 817-515-4254 for more information.

On March 28 in the SSTU Living Room, the Department of Social Sciences will present Lipstick — Sparking a Good Conversation, with Celina Vasquez and Carlos Rovelo.

Take in a free music recital at the SREC Recital Hall at 7:30 p.m. on March 29.

Finish the month of female empowerment with the free 11th Annual Women’s Symposium, entitled Back to Basics: Surviving the Jungle of Life, from 8:15 to 12:30 p.m. March 31 in the SSTU Living Room.

Trinity River Campus

All month long, you can check out the Women’s History Month Book Display in the library. The library will also host a Women’s History Month Book Talk. Check with the library for details. Women’s History Month posters will also be displayed throughout the campus during March.

Enjoy lunch to the music of TCC student Hilary Tipps in the Riverfront Café March 8 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. She will perform original pieces, as well as cover some contemporary pop and folk music. At some point, you’ll have to make a tough choice because Erika Brumley of the YWCA will speak about the importance of the YWCA as part of the “Impact” series from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. in the Idea Store.

Make plans to attend the next Leadership eXperience Summit, featuring Fort Worth Mayor Betsy Price, at noon on March 23 in the Energy Auditorium. Price will share the leadership principles she has learned during her experience as a public servant in the Fort Worth community. The presentation will be followed by a panel discussion led by Tarrant County College faculty and staff.

Bring the kids to the Riverfront Café Saturday, March 24 from 10 a.m. to noon for Story Time for Kids Aged 2-10. The stories will have a Women’s History Month theme, and kids can enjoy crafts and snacks afterward.

Nina Vaca from the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce will speak in the Energy Auditorium March 30 at noon.

Southeast Campus

Journalist, author, writing teacher and Texas storyteller Carmen Goldthwaite will present Outstanding and Unknown Women in Texas History March 6 in the library from 11:30 a.m. to 12:50 p.m.

Stop by Art Corridor 3 anytime March 19 – 30 to see the Women’s History Month Exhibit 50 Remarkable Women, featuring 50 framed portraits and descriptions of well-known and not-so-well-known women.

Northeast Campus

Drop off your donations for the Women’s Center at any of the labeled boxes located throughout the campus during March. You can also check out an art display by Sybil Reddick and the Gallery of Notable Women by the library all month long.

Celebrate women’s experiences with poetry at the Women Speak! Read In from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. in the NLIB 1129 Heritage Room March 2.

Bring your lunch March 9 to join the Visual Series Brown Bag Discussion The Motherhood Manifesto, a multi-media examination of what it means to be a mother in contemporary American society. It’s in the NLIB 1129 Heritage Room from 11:30 to 1:30 p.m.

On March 21, you can listen to and learn from successful women, including our own TCC Chancellor Erma Johnson Hadley, at the Women Speak! Panel Discussion from 9:30 to 11 a.m. in the NLIB 1129 Heritage Room. Other speakers include Yvonne Duque, Director of Education and Outreach at Artes de la Rosa, Rosa Navejar, Hispanic Chamber of Commerce President, Karen Watkins, Child Advocate with CASA. A continental brunch will be served. Reservations are required. Contact Student Activities.

Also on March 21, you can learn about the plight of women who lost their citizenship after marrying Asian men at Marriage Cost Me My Citizenship, presented by archivist Meg Hacker, in the NSTU 1615A Central Corner from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.

Get ready to sip tea while holding your pinky aloft March 28 at the Afternoon Tea, sponsored by Health Services and Student Activities from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. in NSTU 1615A.

Wrap up the month with another Brown Bag Discussion in the Visual Series, Where Have We Been; Where Are We Going? Women’s Images in American Culture, a multi-media exploration of women’s images through history. It’s in the NLIB 1129 Heritage Room from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Northwest Campus

In honor of Women’s History Month, Student Activities at the Northwest Campus will present Triumph:  A Panel Discussion on Success on March 20, from 9:30 to 11 a.m. in WSTU 1305. A women’s panel of administrators, faculty, and staff will discuss their journeys and what it means to be successful.

Editor’s Note: Northeast and Northwest Campus events added March 2, 2012

Play it S.M.A.R.T. when making resolutions

Now that we’re about a week into 2012, have you made any resolutions? Have you already blown any? We asked our friends on the TCC Facebook page to sound off about their New Year’s resolutions, and we got some interesting responses. [Read more…]

Students Sharpen Their Leadership Skills

Students dressed up for a skit

Don London, Jonathan Moreno, Ronald Brown, Perla Pacheo and Karen Peralta (l-r) prepare for their skit performance at the fall Student Leadership Retreat.

It’s only fitting that the future movers and shakers of this world would meet in a kingdom. It was Possum Kingdom; but it was a kingdom, nonetheless. And even though TCC students met there to sharpen their leadership skills, and not to decide who would rule over the opossums, you have to admit that the title Supreme Monarch of Indigenous North American Marsupials would look pretty impressive on a resume. [Read more…]

How Are You Spending Winter Break?

Hot cocoa and lap dogs

Many of you are planning to spend some quality "pack time" with the dogs and the remote during the break.

Whether you use it for traveling, relaxing or just beginning to mark off the final year on your Mayan calendar, your well-deserved Winter Break is almost here. We asked about your holiday plans on the TCC Facebook page and received some interesting responses. We weren’t trying to keep tabs on you. We were just fishing for ideas.

And the Survey Says:

Rest and relaxation were the dominating themes, with many of you planning to reward yourselves with a little time to unwind and to gear up for the next semester. Settling down for a long winter’s nap seemed to be a popular option, although the definition of “long” seems to vary. Tiffani Covais said she’s looking forward to sleeping past 5 a.m.

Forming a TCC-student-shaped indention in the sofa while watching a few movies also scored high on our informal survey. Paula Strittmatter said, “Can’t wait to cozy up under a blanket, with hot cocoa and a movie, for at least two or three days after exams.” Around here, we’re never sure if the temperature’s going to be 17 or 70. So be prepared to substitute shorts and a Slurpee for that blanket and hot cocoa.

No Rest for the Weary

Winter Break doesn’t always mean rest and relaxation. Many of you said you’d either be working or trying to find work over the break. And the holidays seem to be especially hard on our nursing students. Charlotte Lawrence, Christy Holland Spooner and Ruth Nyamete posted plans to study for entrance exams, read textbooks or apply to nursing school while the rest of us are relaxing, partying or a-wassailing. And some real overachievers like, Misael Giron and Earl Alzner, posted that they were signing up for one of our TCC WinterMester classes, mini-courses which convene over the break. Wait a minute; didn’t Earl Alzner play Santa in the movie Elf?

There’s No Place like Somewhere Else for the Holidays

While many of you said you were sticking close to home over the break, some of you have plans to hit the road. Preferred destinations ranged from Disney World to the Rocky Mountains. For those of you who are staying here and longing for a mountain view, you can take in the breathtaking vista of the big hill with the Channel 11 TV tower from Interstate 30.

Regardless of how you plan to spend your Winter Break, please be careful and come back safely. And keep an eye out for Chelsea Oakley. She said she’ll be working on getting her driver’s license.

TREC Shines at Grand Opening

Bright skies, lively music and smiling faces were the order of the day Saturday, Oct. 1, when hundreds of visitors got a firsthand look at our award-winning Trinity River East Campus in downtown Fort Worth.

The artistic structure filled with state-of-the art equipment houses TCC’s Center for Health Care Professions that is helping to meet the rising demands of one of the area’s fastest growing industries.

simulation hospitalTour goers gasped in amazement as they visited the simulation hospital and watched life-like mannequins respond to programmed illnesses. Chancellor Erma Johnson Hadley introduced Toro, TCC’s trailblazing mascot, who added to the day’s festivities. TCC Board of Trustee President Bill Greenhill and Trustee Kristin Vandergriff also took part in the grand opening.

Special thanks to hundreds of volunteers who helped make the day possible by providing tours, serving food and drinks, and helping visitors find their way. The event’s success was also possible because of the support of local businesses including Dr Pepper Snapple Group, Educational Catering, Inc., Follett Higher Education Group and Struhs Companies.

See photos and other scenes from TREC’s grand opening.